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WEATHER IN CARSON CITY


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Group opposed to present plans for a 203 home subdivision on Carson City’s West Side

203 home subdivision off Mountain and Long on Carson City’s west side.

A group of westside Carson City residents met Monday evening to review a proposed 203 home housing subdivision to be placed on the the sprawling remnants of the Anderson Ranch, west of Mountain Street, south of Long Street, and north of Ormsby Boulevard.

The developer plans include at least 203 homes on various lot sizes, the majority of which will be on the smaller end of the scale.  During the mini-town hall meeting Monday night, the neighbors once again complained that the west side is an historical place in time, beautifully frozen in history – but something that out-of-state developers want to transform into a California-style subdivision.  Surrounding residents decry the cookie-cutter plans that will cram over 200 homes onto the historic Andersen Ranch that, until recently, was used to raise beef cattle.

Anderson Ranch developers say there will be green space that surrounds pretty much the whole development, with walking paths and lots of shade trees.  But as you can see from the above photo, the walking path lies within a thin band of green circling the subdivision that the developer contends is open space.  Many disagree with that designation complaining that the circle of green around the housing development is very narrow – not exactly expansive open space.

Residents of nearby neighborhoods who want to see the ranch preserved – not built on – believe 203 homes on just over 40 acres means crowded, tightly packed single family homes, the layout of which will clash with surrounding neighborhoods, bringing traffic congestion in the morning and late afternoons, increased wear-and-tear on streets and more pressure on local schools and medical facilities which are already stretched thin.  The developers admitted probable impacts from traffic and indicated that although there will be more traffic, it’s manageable.  The neighbors disagree.  They claim that over 200 new homes means a lot more cars and utility vehicles coursing through surrounding neighborhoods to access major arterials.  Neighbors contend that their tranquil residential streets will become bustling lines of traffic at least two to three times a day during the week – in short, a substantial drop in quality of life for residents who live in the area, not to mention worsening the challenge for already overburdened schools and local medical facilities.

In response the developers cited a traffic study they sponsored to ascertain the traffic impacts from the proposed Andersen Ranch subdivision.  Residents complained that the study, which suggested tolerable levels of added traffic, was done during a slack time of the year when schools were transitioning into summer vacation and when nearby arterials were being upgraded using heavy construction machinery which caused many drivers to avoid the area. The developers disagreed with those assessments.

The Anderson Ranch subdivision proposal comes up before the Carson City Board of Supervisors on January 16th at the Community Center.  No official time has yet been officially set.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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