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WEATHER IN CARSON CITY


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Carson City Supervisors Declare an Emergency

Corona Virus
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The Carson City Board of Supervisors Thursday declared a “State of Emergency” due to the continued rampage of the Covid-19 virus that made landfall in our country – hitching a ride on an airliner from China to the United States last December.

The outbreak of Covid-19 across the U.S. was further accelerated by what’s been described as a hap-hazard attitude by President Trump and his cabinet because even the Center for Disease Control said the U.S. missed its chance to strangle the virus when it made first landfall on the West Coast. Airliners then took over as being the primary delivery mechanism for the virus which seems to prefer older humans – age 50 and up. Although lately we’re hearing stories that even young people are coming down with it. They get mildly sick then get well.

Meanwhile, back in Carson City, we just added a third  person (3/20) who has come down with the virus. Medical experts say the virus can stay alive in younger people and never cause any symptoms. Again, that’s how the virus spreads.  Neither the carrier nor the new victim knows what’s going on.

Testing is said to be the best tool to use to fight the virus. But test kits have been slow in coming.  Without adequate testing we can’t derive where the bug has come from or where it’s going. In short, the U.S. was caught absolutely flat-footed with deadly consequences. And the death toll is rising.

Against this backdrop Governor Steve Sisolak has been closing casinos, restaurants, sports events, bars and other venues where people congregate.  Governor Sisolak is recommending that, where appropriate, Nevadans should hunker down and work from their homes – but of course not everybody can do that.

Carson City Supervisors went down a check list of tactics Carson City citizens should use to avoid infection  – don’t go into crowded rooms, be on the look out for anyone sneezing or coughing, wash your hands over and over all day long because touching objects like table tops, cellphones and computer keyboards can put the Covid-19 virus right on your hands. All you have to do is rub your eyes, touch your nose or lips and you’ll probably come down with it. These viruses can survive up to three days on various surfaces so be alert. Sanitize, sanitize, sanitize.

Meanwhile, access to fire and sheriff’s facilities has been tightly curtailed. You’ll find the doors locked so its best to use your phone to get service.  Libraries are closed.  After school and recreation activities have been slashed.

There are several strains of potential anti-bodies that are being refined in Israel which should come to market fairly soon.  They say their vaccine will kill the Covid-19 virus.  Other researchers in the U.S. say they’re about to come up with a vaccine of their own.  But like all “new” drugs, they’ve got to go through trial runs.  They must create a track record of the drug’s performance.  The expected timeline to get this vaccine to those who desperately need it ranges from two to eighteen months.

The city’s State of Emergency is very well described on the city’s website: Click here.

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In other council action, councilors made it official that the community’s two marijuana sales outlets will have to reign in their operating schedule.  The Supervisors, on a split vote, set 8am as the opening time and 10pm for closing.  The old schedule had the stores closing at 11pm.

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Next…the Supervisors decided to punt rather than immediately set up a revenue district to help pay for the maintenance of sidewalks, trees, turf and other amenities along the South Carson Street improvement project.  There is a patchwork of right-of-way encroachments by businesses up and down both sides of the roadway.  The nexus is to determine how much in revenue should businesses pay into what’s called a Neighborhood Improvement District – maintenance of sidewalks, trees, and other infrastructure that will help marry the south end of Carson Street to the main downtown area to the north.  Supervisors proposed various scenarios but eventually tabled the assessment for now.  They decided to take their time coming up with a fair and equitable assessment plan.  It appeared during the discussion that the assessment would eventually be 2/3 from businesses and 1/3 from the city.

The whole idea is to beautify the south end of Carson Street so that property values go up as well as income for the businesses.  Supervisors will take up the matter again, likely in May.  Meanwhile construction upgrades along South Carson Street are progressing nicely.

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And finally, under the heading of “What’s good for the goose is good for the other goose,” the Supervisors surrendered their desire to have developers take over their own street(s) and, in turn, dedicate them to the city for their upkeep.  The Supervisors had recently turned down another developer who wanted to have the city take over his streets on Emerson just north of College Parkway.  At that time the city council decided that the owner of the property himself should maintain those streets because the city’s road maintenance budget was just about empty – leaving many stretches of Carson City roadways full of cracks and growing potholes.  The developer accepted ownership of his streets.

But this week, another developer, who wants to build more than thirty homes off the northwest corner of Clearview and Silver Sage, asked the city council to take over the streets in his proposed development.  But unlike the earlier case he agreed to pay immediately for a slurry seal to lengthen the life of the brand new pavement –  the slurry seal to be applied five to seven years down the road. It was agreed that the slurry seal would just about double the lifespan of the pavement.  The developer also agreed that the cost of the slurry seal would be paid for at the time the city approves his project so the city will have the money when it’s time to re-seal the pavement.

Mayor Bob Crowell then challenged the council to go back to the first developer, who they denied the same street arrangement over on Emerson.  Mayor Crowell said that it is only fair to offer that developer the same deal.  

To be continued.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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