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WEATHER IN CARSON CITY


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Outdoor burning in Carson City as well as off-roading

Effective July 13th, the Carson City Fire Department is implementing fire restrictions on city and privately owned lands within Carson City.

Vegetation in western Nevada has dried out significantly. A large crop of grass and brush is evident at lower elevations and trees and other forest vegetation at higher elevations are quickly drying out. The public is encouraged to safely enjoy the public lands, bearing in mind that human-caused fires annually threaten human life, private property and public lands every summer.

Off-highway motor vehicle enthusiasts are advised that hot exhaust systems can ignite dry grasses. The potential for another devastating fire during the summer is very real. Report fires to the Carson City Dispatch Center by calling 911.

Fire Restrictions Prohibit:

1. Building, maintaining, attending or using a fire (using wood, charcoal or any other material), campfire, or stove fire except a portable stove using gas or pressurized liquid fuel, outside of a developed fee campground or picnic area (except by permit).

2. Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle or at a developed campground or picnic area.

3. Operating vehicles or other motorized equipment off of existing paved, gravel, or dirt roads.

4. Welding, or operating an acetylene torch with open flames, except by permit.

5. Using or causing to be used, any explosive, except by permit.

6. Possession or use of fireworks (always prohibited), or any other incendiary device.

7. No Use of tracer rounds, steel-core ammunition or exploding targets while recreational shooting.

8. No Open burning (e.g. weeds, brush and yard debris).

In addition, the Nevada Division of Forestry has placed travel restrictions within the Sierra Fire Protection District. These restrictions prohibit operating vehicles off of existing hard surface gravel roads or dirt roads in wildland areas, and operating vehicles or equipment traveling on or using wildland areas without at least an axe, shovel and one gallon of water. The BLM and the Forest Service recommend avoiding cross-country travel whenever possible to prevent grass from igniting from hot exhaust systems. Those city agencies that have responsibility to perform off road work should pay particular attention to where vehicles are driven, parked, or stopped.

These restrictions do not prevent individual property owners from the safe use of BBQ’s, Chimeras, or patio fireplaces provided they are used on non-combustible surfaces away from ignitable wildland fuels on their own property.

Motorcyclist take a tumble in heavy traffic on Highway 50 East

Carson City paramedics tend to the motorcycle victim who lost control of his cycle Wednesday afternoon as he approached a long back-up of traffic Wednesday afternoon on Highway 50 East.

Traffic was backed up to the highway horizon as paramedics tended to the seriously injured motorcyclist.

Once inside the ambulance paramedics prepare the victim for the flight to the trauma center in Reno.

A Life Flight chopper lands nearby and the victim is loaded aboard.

Moments later, Life Flight is off to Reno with their injured patient aboard.

Explosion rocks NE CC neighborhood – no injuries but at least four cars were destroyed

Fire and explosion outside apartment building on No. Edmonds near Brown St.

 

Carson City Sheriff’s Deputies along with the Carson City Fire Department were called out in the wee hours of the morning Wednesday on a report of a very loud explosion outside an apartment complex at 178 Brown St, facing North Edmonds.

At least four vehicles were set ablaze at around 4am. So far, no one in custody.

Authorities pulled up to see tall flames rising from the burning vehicles that were later reported to be deliberately set on fire.  Thus far, no suspect(s) are in custody.

The CCSO is asking help from local citizens to help them track down who pulled off a very dangerous explosion and fire.  If you know anything about this incident, or know who may have been behind it, call the Carson City Sheriff’s Office at 775-887-2677.  Or, Secret Witness at 775-322-4900.

Dumpster blaze threatened power lines and nearby cars

Big dumpster flames up against the fence at apartment complex on Woodside.

Carson City Firefighters were called to the scene of a large trash dumpster fire late Sunday afternoon.  A woman called the fire department and said that flames were rising very high, endangering a phone and powerline pole with hot flames and thick smoke.

Firefighters pulled up and immediately began fighting the blaze that was perilously close to parked cars and just a fence away from Fairview Drive.

Firefighter soaking down what’s left of dumpster fire.

Firefighters were able to knock the fire down in less than 15 minutes.  But then came the task of dragging out still burning and smoking trash from inside the dumpster.  Firefighters soaked it down.

As for a cause investigators say the fire burned so hot in a confined space that the precise spot where the fire erupted may be hard to determine. But suffice it to say the fire did erupt – one neighbor telling The Carson City Journal that even someone flinging a lit cigarette into the overflow pile of trash, pushed by a stiff afternoon breeze, might have been the cause.

Soaking down vehicles to prevent fire damage.

Fortunately no one was injured.  Firefighters say that flicking or flinging lit or glowing materials into a dumpster is always dangerous.  In this case there was a phone and power pole very close to the dumpster which could have damaged the power pole, electrical, cable TV and other systems that use power poles.

Woman screaming that her apartment is on fire at 1600 Airport Road

Carson City Firefighters were dispatched Sunday evening to a report of an apartment fire at 1600 Airport Road with a woman possibly trapped inside screaming.  She told 9-1-1 that the fire was big and that she had just gotten out of the building.

While firefighters were enroute, speedy Carson City Sheriff’s Deputies pulled up and began looking for the fire.  One of the deputies radioed 9-1-1 dispatch that there appeared to be no fire and that they had spotted what looked like the woman who had been screaming “fire!.”  Deputies approached the woman and began talking to her about her situation.  Firefighters turned around and headed back to their stations.

All Clear at Seal Rock State Park/Beach

Seal Rock State Beach
It’s safe to go in to the water again….

 

Health advisory for water contact at Agate Beach, Seal Rock State Park Beach and Harris Beach lifted July 1

Testing shows fecal bacteria levels have subsided

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) today lifted a public health advisory for contact with marine water at Agate Beach and Seal Rock State Park Beach, both in Lincoln County, and Harris Beach, in Curry County. The health authority issued the advisories June 26 and 27 after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from later samples taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) showed lower bacteria levels. Contact with the water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk. However, officials recommend staying out of large pools on the beach that are frequented by birds, and runoff from those pools, because the water may contain increased bacteria from fecal matter.

State officials continue to encourage other recreational activities at all Oregon beaches, suggesting only that water contact be avoided when advisories are in effect.

Since 2003, state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are OHA, DEQ and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

For more information, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0440, or call the OHA toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

Wanted: Skilled Case Managers!!

Senior and Disability Services Case Managers, Toledo Office– $22.23 – 24.53/hr (40 hrs/wk) plus excellent benefits.  We are searching for dynamic and skilled case managers.  Successful candidates will conduct service assessments, develop care plans, and coordinate a variety of  community resources to best meet consumer need. Must be able to work independently and handle a high volume of work.  Excellent interpersonal and organizational skills required.  Bachelor degree in social services or related field preferred. A combination of education and experience working in human services will be considered.  Application process and detailed job descriptions available by visiting our website at www.ocwcog.org  . Email OCWCOG Human Resources with questions – hrrecruit@ocwcog.org . Only applicants selected for interview will be notified.  EOE.

State Senate votes to clean up our air….

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Senate Authorization Will Protect Almost ½ of the State’s Population

SALEM — In a 16-to-11 vote in favor of HB 2007, the Oregon Senate has voted to protect the health of Oregonian from harmful pollution. HB 2007 requires the clean-up of old dirty diesel engines in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington counties, where 44% of the state’s population lives.

When diesel is burned, it emits fine particulate matter, NOx (a smog-forming pollutant) and 44 air toxics, such as benzene and acetaldehyde. This diesel exhaust is uniquely toxic; its human health toll includes cancer, heart disease and heart attacks, asthma attacks, reduced lung growth in children, birth anomalies and autism, male infertility and more. It is estimated to cause up to 460 premature deaths per year in Oregon.

“Eleven years ago Oregon set a goal to reduce diesel pollution so that it would bring cancer risk below one in a million, but efforts to date have reduced less than 2% of the diesel pollution we would need to meet that health standard,” said Chris Hagerbaumer, Deputy Director of Oregon Environmental Council. “We applaud the state representatives and senators who understand that we must fast-track diesel cleanup.”

“HB 2007 will expedite the purchase of new diesel engines that run as much as 95% cleaner, as well as accelerate the transition to cleaner fuels, like electricity, to power engines,” said Morgan Gratz-Weiser, Legislative Director of Oregon Environmental Council. “By setting a deadline for clean-up, the Oregon Legislature has given fleet owners the impetus to move quickly to protect the health of the communities they work in and travel through.” 

HB 2007 will start diesel clean-up in the tri-county area (Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington counties) by requiring:

  • Engine standards for diesel-powered trucks: By 2023 all medium-duty (e.g., delivery vans, garbage trucks) and heavy-duty trucks (e.g., big rigs) will be required to run on a 1997 or newer engine; and by 2029 medium-duty trucks will need to run on a 2010 or newer diesel engines, as well as publicly owned heavy-duty trucks. Trucks can also comply by switching to cleaner fuels or trapping pollution with special filters. 
  • Phase-out of resale of old diesel engines: After 2025, there will be no titling of medium-duty trucks running engines older than 2010 and no titling of heavy-duty trucks running engines older than 2007.
  • Clean construction: State-funded construction projects costing $20 million or more in the tri-county area will require 80% clean equipment, and construction equipment owners will be encouraged to display a sticker that shows the emissions profile of the engine.
  • VW settlement funds: Approximately $53 million will assist the trucks and equipment subject to clean-up, prioritizing applications that support cleaner fuels, and grant applicants running minority-owned, women-owned, service-disabled veteran owned businesses, disadvantaged business enterprises, or emerging small businesses.
  • Future success: A task force will develop new funding strategies to support businesses across the entire state in upgrading their fleets.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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