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Cross Country skiing at Tahoe is overflowing with WOW!!

Thanks to recent winter storms, Lake Tahoe Nevada State Park – Spooner Lake has the snowpack needed to groom cross-country ski trails. The 5 km system of meandering trails wind through dense forest, across an open meadow and along the banks of Spooner Lake. The trail system is made possible by a partnership between Nevada State Parks and Nevada Nordic, a non-profit group based in the Tahoe Basin.

The scenic, intermediate trail includes varied flat and rolling terrain, which makes it great for both families and experienced skiers. For updated trail conditions, visit nevadanordic.org

When using the trails, please be mindful of trail etiquette:

  • • Do not walk on the trail in shoes or boots.
  • • Dogs should be on a leash of not more than 6 feet in length and off to the side of the groomed trails.
  • • Snowshoers are welcome but should stay to the far edge of the trail and be careful not to mar the center of the trail for skate skiing, or the tracks set for classic skiing. 

All access to cross-country ski trails are open to the public at no additional charge. There is an entrance fee into the park of $10 per vehicle. Spooner Lake is located near the intersection of Hwy 50 and 28.

High Speed Chase on northbound 580

9::05am  High speed chase going on in Carson City.  Sheriff’s Deputies are chasing a black Chevy Silverado.  Now on east Nye at a high rate of speed.  Traffic is light.

9:11am  Vehicle has only one person in it.

9:11am  Northbound on Airport.

9:12am  Silverado stopped or crashed.  Driver jumped out and started running into the neighborhood.

9:13am  Deputies have him at gunpoint.  Hispanic male adult.  He’s in handcuffs.

Pandemic or no Pandemic a state needs an Attorney General 24/7

Attorney General Aaron Ford (R) and Dr. Jason Collins (L)

Attorney General Ford Receives 2nd COVID-19 Vaccine and Speaks to Local Doctor About the Importance of Getting Vaccinated

Carson City, NV – On February 4, 2021 Nevada Attorney General Aaron D. Ford received his second dose of the COVID-19 vaccine as a member of law enforcement. Law enforcement officers are currently eligible for a vaccine under the “Public Safety Prioritization Lane” outlined in the Nevada Health Response COVID-19 Vaccine Playbook.

During his vaccination, AG Ford took the time to have a conversation with Dr. Jason Collins about the importance of getting vaccinated and to dispel some of the misinformation circulating related to the vaccine.

“I want to thank Carson-Tahoe Health for administering my second dose of the COVID- 19 vaccine and for allowing me to have an educational conversation with Dr. Jason Collins,” said AG Ford. “Stopping a pandemic requires everyone’s help and that also means doing your part in getting vaccinated. There are a lot of myths and misinformation circulating especially among minority communities, and I was thrilled to converse with Dr. Collins who is both a physician and an African American. Together, we hope to help Nevadans who may be skeptical of receiving this vaccine.”

“Over generations, minorities were at one point used as subjects in medical experiments, tests, even case studies,” continued AG Ford. “The lack of equity, fairness, and equality in the medical world is very prevalent, today. As part of a minority group even more vulnerable to this virus, this vaccine is all the more important. As Governor Sisolak noted in announcing his Equity and Fairness Initiative, communities of color are disproportionately likely to be affected by COVID-19, yet less likely to have received a vaccine.”

“Vaccines work hand in hand with your immune system to help your body fight the COVID-19 virus if you’re exposed. I’m encouraging all Nevadans to do their part by getting vaccinated. Help yourself and others and stay strong Nevada.”

For more information on Nevada’s COVID-19 vaccine, visit Immunize Nevada here. To view AG Ford’s conversation with Dr. Collins, click here.

Latest Tally on the Corona Virus Invasion….

Quad-County COVID-19 Update: 43 New Cases and 19 Recoveries 

(Carson City, NV)- Carson City Health and Human Services (CCHHS) is reporting 43 new cases and 197 additional recoveries of COVID-19 in the Quad-County Region. This brings the total number of cases to 10,879, with 7,591 recoveries and 192 deaths; 3,096 cases remain active.

Total Cases Active Cases Recoveries Deaths *Population
Carson City 5,747 1,624 4,017 106 56,546
Douglas County 2,416 691 1,696 29 49,695
Lyon County 2,642 765 1,822 55 57,987
Storey County 74 16 56 2 4,465
Quad-County 10,879 3,096 7,591 192 168,693

*Population information taken from the Nevada Health Response Dashboard found at https://nvhealthresponse.nv.gov/

CCHHS COVID-19 Vaccinations

Vaccine statistics are updated weekly on Tuesday. These are the doses received and administered by CCHHS ONLY. This does not include other vaccinations by other entities in the Quad-County Region. As of February 1, 2021

  • Total Number of Doses received: 8,775
    • 1st Doses: 7,475
    • 2nd Doses: 1,300
  • Total Number of Doses administered: 8,704
    • 1st Doses: 7,613
    • 2nd Doses: 1,091

 

Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing for Quad-County Residents

Testing is for Quad-County (Carson City, Douglas, Lyon, and Storey County) residents ONLY, all others will be turned away. Events may be canceled 48 hours in advance if inclement weather is expected. Testing is free of charge, no appointments or reservations. To view all upcoming events visit  https://gethealthycarsoncity.org/events/.

Date Time Location
2/10/2021 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Storey County Emergency Management Satellite Office

20 E. Street, Virginia City  

2/12/2021 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Carson City Corporate Yard

549 Airport Rd.

For those who are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 or have questions, call the Quad-County COVID-19 Hotline Monday through Friday, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. Spanish speakers are available. The phone number is (775) 434-1988.

More than enough snow at Tahoe for cross-country skiing…Nevada State Parks


Lake Tahoe –  Thanks to recent winter storms, Lake Tahoe Nevada State Park, Spooner Lake has the snowpack needed to groom cross-country ski trails. The 5 kilometer system of meandering trails wind through dense forest, across an open meadow and along the banks of Spooner Lake.  The trail system is made possible by a partnership between Nevada State Parks and Nevada Nordic, a non-profit group based in the Tahoe Basin.

The scenic, intermediate trail includes varied flat and rolling terrain, which makes it great for both families and experienced skiers.

For updated trail conditions, visit nevadanordic.org.

When using the trails at Nevada State Parks please be mindful of trail etiquette:
— Do not walk on the trail in shoes or boots.

— Dogs should be on a leash of not more than 6 feet in length and off to the side of the groomed trails.

— Snowshoers are welcome but should stay to the far edge of the trail and be careful not to mar the center of the trail for skate skiing, or the tracks set for classic skiing.

All access to cross-country ski trails are open to the public at no additional charge. There is an entrance fee into the park of $10 per vehicle.

Governor Sisolak takes to the air waves over vaccine distribution…

Governor Steve Sisolak

Today, Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak released a video message (at the bottom of this page) announcing a new Equity and Fairness Initiative aimed at ensuring that equity is a cornerstone of all vaccination efforts.

In the last month, the State has made incredible gains leveraging State resources to expand vaccination sites, get more boots on the ground with support of the Nevada National Guard and federal personnel, expand the vaccinator workforce, and clear a data backlog in Southern Nevada.

While substantial progress has been made to ensure doses are being administered, challenges still remain. One of the major challenges identified is equity and fairness in vaccine allocation.

According to vaccination data released by the Southern Nevada Health District, Clark County is facing a vaccine equity challenge, resulting in a disparity in who is receiving the vaccine that does not reflect the demographics of that region. Additionally, there are concerns over the Nevada COVID-19 Vaccination Playbook not being followed, resulting in an unfair allocation of vaccines, confusion among the public, and access to vaccines by ineligible groups or individuals.

“Equity and fairness requires an intentional effort to reach every community and not create a situation where those who have been disproportionately impacted by this virus are left behind – including the elderly and our frontline workers,” said Gov. Sisolak. “As we continue to fight for more doses from the federal government, it’s critical that the Nevada Vaccine Playbook is followed to support equitable vaccine distribution. While substantial progress has been made to ensure doses are being administered, challenges still remain — but there’s no problem that we cannot solve as a State when we work together.”

Under this initiative, the state will work with Clark County Emergency Management and Southern Nevada Health District to clarify prioritization lanes, support fair access to vaccines through site selection, and equitable allocation across communities. Updates and progress will be reported publicly to the COVID-19 Mitigation and Management Task Force.

If equity and fairness issues arise in other areas throughout the State, focus will be given to alleviate challenges there as well.

The Governor’s full remarks can be found in the video message here: https://youtu.be/kXeay89mzzg.

Local law enforcement crackdown scheduled for February 4 through February 13th

The Carson City Sheriff’s Office is joining forces with other Nevada Law Enforcement Agencies from February 4th through February 13th to enforce impaired driving laws and keep impaired drivers off of Nevada roadways.

It doesn’t take much to be an impaired driver. Use of illicit drugs or misuse of prescription drugs can make driving a vehicle unsafe—just like driving after drinking alcohol. Nationwide, statistics show that on average about 44 percent of drivers involved in fatal crashes tested positive for drugs.

Not only is alcohol and illegal drug use a cause of impairment, legally prescribed medication use can lead to impaired driving. If you are using legally prescribed medication and driving you could be charged with driving under the influence.

Nevada Revised Statute 484c.110 makes it illegal to drive or be in actual physical control of a motor vehicle while under the influence of any controlled substance. This includes prescription medications.

If you do use prescribed medications, create social strategies to prevent having to be behind the wheel.

  • Use a designated driver, taxi, public transportation.
  • Have items delivered, many companies will deliver food and supplies.
  • Discuss the risks with your friends and family.

Any death caused by impaired driving is 100% preventable; make the right choice, drive safe, drive sober.

The Carson City Sheriff’s Office remains dedicated to bringing the number of fatalities on our roadways to zero through increasing public awareness about the dangers of driving under the influence of drugs and alcohol. More information about safe driving and the state’s Zero Fatalities goal is available online at www.ZeroFatalitiesNV.com.

The Nevada Department of Public Safety’s- Office of Traffic Safety (OTS) provides funding for law enforcement agencies to participate in Joining Forces to reduce traffic deaths and injuries on Nevada roadways. Visit www.zerofatalitiesnv.com for more information.

Nevada Tobacco Prevention Coalition

The Nevada Tobacco Prevention Coalition brought together experts from throughout the state last month to discuss the dangers of youth vaping, and what parents and other adults can do to protect them from this dangerous and addictive substance.

At the end of the presentation, State Senator Julia Ratti recognized the importance of the problem by declaring January 26, “Youth Vaping Prevention and Awareness Day.”

“Youth vaping has skyrocketed over the past several years and in 2019 our state lawmakers recognized the need to reduce youth use of vape products and prevent additional youth from starting,” said NTPC President Kelli Goatley-Seals. “With the funding designated by lawmakers, NTPC has worked with national and statewide leaders in vaping prevention to develop a campaign to educate youth and adults about the short-term and long-term dangers of using vape products.”

There has been a more than 45 percent increase (between 2017-2019) in teens reporting they have vaped in the last thirty days, according to findings from the 2019 Nevada Youth Risk Behavior Survey. UNR researchers found that 22.5 percent of teens had vaped in the last 30 days, compared to 15.5 percent in 2017, and in certain counties within the northern and rural regions of Nevada, prevalence rates were above 36 percent.

Go here for the panel discussion video.

Hidden Dangers of Vaping
The vaping industry continues to manipulate teens into thinking that vapes are harmless. According to studies:
Many electronic vapor products heat liquids that contain nicotine, the same drug that makes cigarettes addictive. “When e-cigarettes first became popular in the U.S. about seven or eight years ago, most delivered very little nicotine to the user,” explained Jennifer Pearson, PhD, MPH, an assistant professor at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). “But now, a lot of e-cigarettes use a different formulation – a nicotine salt solution — that makes the nicotine much more bio-available. People who use these nicotine salt solution e-cigarettes have blood nicotine concentrations that look a lot like they’re smoking cigarettes.”

Youth are more at risk for addiction to the nicotine contained in vapes because their brains are still developing, leading to other addictions such as cigarettes.

The exposure of a young brain to nicotine can cause mood disorders and permanently lower impulse control.
Vapes aren’t just “water vapor.” The aerosol from vapes contains ultrafine particles, heavy metals and other chemicals that can damage a teen’s lungs. “In my own research, the most common symptoms that teens mention from vaping is wheezing and coughing, which they say have done things like hurt their performance in sports or the arts like singing,” Pearson said. “The good news is that, in all but the most rare, extreme cases, this damage will reverse itself if the teen stops vaping.”

Ease of acquisition and hiding from parents:
Vapes are pretty easy to get for teens — nearly 60 percent of high school students in Nevada said it would be easy for them to get a vape if they wanted one in 2019.

Most vapes don’t look like what adults think of as drug paraphernalia. “There are a lot of ways that teens can hide these products in plain sight of their parents and teachers,” said Malcolm Ahlo, Tobacco Control Program Coordinator for the Southern Nevada Health District. “They look like pens, highlighters, phone chargers and even other electronic products.”

Vaping doesn’t smell like smoke, making it even more difficult to detect – vaping just gives off a light odor of whatever flavor is being vaped.

What can parents do?
Parents have the power to help their teens and young adults protect themselves.

“Our data show that if kids think their parents disapprove of e-cigarette use, they are much less likely to use e-cigarettes, and this is especially true for middle school aged adolescents ” Pearson said. “Parents need to strongly communicate to their kids that this is not acceptable, it is not just water vapor, and they are addictive.”

NTPC shares these tips for parents:
Like any other important conversation you have with your teen — do not panic. Look for ways to work you concern about vaping into everyday conversation instead of lecturing or giving them “the talk.”

Show you child that you’re listening and give them opportunity to talk openly.

Ask them about their mood and mental health in general. Vaping and symptoms of anxiety and depression often travel together. Kids might be vaping as a way to deal with these symptoms and would benefit from talking with a doctor.

Focus on the facts instead of scare tactics. Adolescents can smell an overstatement a mile away and that will hurt your credibility with them.

Additional tips and programs to help teens quit vaping can be found on letstalkvaping.com

Anti-Vaping Campaign
To better educate teens and their families about the dangers of vaping, NTPC introduced the Behind The Haze NV campaign in 2020 to deliver educational content that exposes the truth about vapes and discourages use among Nevada teens ages 13-18 years old. Let’s Talk Vaping is a complimentary campaign that was introduced in late 2020, and is designed to give adults the tools they need to fight this dangerous habit.

The campaign was developed with support for SB263 from state legislators Heidi Gansert, Marilyn Dondero Loop, David Parks and Julia Ratti. This funding allowed for collection of data from youth statewide, which has helped to inform the campaign, and also allows for broader education to unveil the unethical tactics of the vaping industry.

For more information on Nevada Tobacco Prevention Coalition, research and the dangers of vaping please visit www.tobaccofreenv.org.

About Nevada Tobacco Prevention Coalition
NTPC is a collaboration of organizations and individuals that work in public health, health care, local and national nonprofits, community-based organizations, insurance payors, professional and medical associations, higher education, and government. NTPC members work together and pool resources toward the goal of ultimately eliminating commercial tobacco use and secondhand smoke exposure as a public health issue.
NTPC’s mission is to improve the health of all Nevadans by reducing the burden of tobacco use and nicotine addiction. For a comprehensive list of members and for more information on NTPC, please visit www.tobaccofreenv.org or like us on Facebook.


Streamling the DA’s Office, Getting Vaccine Serum into arms and Insuring Continued Operations of the Childrens Museum

Community Center
Board of Supervisors meeting location….

City Supervisors today gave the go ahead for District Attorney Jason Woodbury to streamline and make much more efficient the city’s procedures in handling criminal cases.  Woodbury went through a very complicated assessment of his office, pointing out inefficiencies in the way data and criminal evidence is processed and the length of time it often takes to determine a suspect’s sentencing for a criminal act and conviction, or determining whether the suspect is innocent.  Woodbury says his office has a set of very logical procedures but their traditional ways of processing information and adjudication can be far better handled with more up to date computerized processes at handling evidence surrounding a case.

Woodbury went over the advantages of abandoning some of their computer programs and devoting more energy and funds to acquire newer computer resources and software for the DA’s office.  Woodbury said suspected criminal information can be handled more quickly from arrest, to incarceration, case study, information mitigation and discovery at a lightning pace.  Cases can be more efficiently processed and decided upon.  In short, justice moves at a faster and more accurate pace.  And probably at lower cost.

An impressed Board of Supervisors was quick to approve Woodbury’s request for the overhaul of his department’s evidentiary work flow.  Woodbury told the Board that the transition to the new system will take some time but in the end, the new system – which is nearly revolutionizing District Attorney’s offices all across the country – will finally arrive in Carson City.  Woodbury and the Board of Supervisors agreed that the slightly higher cost for the new system will be softened by the cost savings it will generate by hyper-streamlining the work flow.

The Supervisors also agreed to a Carson City Children’s Museum lease extension.  The lease came in at a whopping $1 a year.  Yup…one dollar….which of course helps the Children’s Museum devote more energy and more resources that are made possible with public and business donations going toward the goals of the museum.  A really good deal for further educating the children of Carson City.  

And finally the Supervisors were told by Carson City Health officials and Covid-19 vaccination folks that the distribution of vaccine has been going very well.  In many areas of the country the distribution has been up and down….sometimes nothing – but Nevada has been hangin’ in there.  The initial distribution set-up was highly irregular but Nevada health and other officials managed to smooth out the delivery.  But there have been complaints among entities representing senior citizens that the elderly has been short-changed lately prompting Governor Sisolak to pump up that group of people.  At the same time, complaints have arisen that teachers and kids need to get back to school so students will hopefully have instructors “live” in the classroom as opposed to just internet connections.

Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak grateful for vaccine deliveries – wants FEMA to keep up the pace…

Governor Steve Sisolak – wants more vaccines for Nevada.

A report from Governor Steve Sisolak indicates that although Nevada has been receiving a lot anti-Covide-19 shots, Nevada should get more vaccines for those who need them.

In an update provided from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), based on federal data Nevada has received over 324,000 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine and has administered 248,000 doses — or 76.7 percent of doses received in the State.

Nevada is currently leading all states and territories in FEMA Region 9 when it comes to percent of doses administered.

The Governor said, “I could not be more proud of Nevada’s immunization program for continuing to push forward and make sure that we are distributing doses of the COVID-19 vaccine as fast as we can. These numbers are a result of a statewide concentrated effort to use every resource at our disposal and to focus our collective efforts on this historic immunization effort, in addition to the additional federal assistance the Biden-Harris Administration has provided.

The Governor continued, “While we are still not getting the number of doses we’d like, the State and our local partners are efficiently administering the doses we currently receive. I will continue to fight for more doses for Nevada, and as more are delivered to the State, we will continue to increase our efforts.”

 

Four Nevada Counties Snub Governor Sisolak’s Orders on Emergency Directives

Corona Virus

Governor Steve Sisolak has put together a plan to bring all Nevada Counties into compliance when it comes to facemasks, public gatherings, distancing and handwashing.  But the counties of Lyon, White Pine, Eureka and Elko said, in so many words….”Heck no.  We’ve declared ourselves independent because we’re under an emergency.  Therefore Governor Sisolak has no jurisdiction over how we handle the Covid-19 inside our own county boundaries.”

The counties declared their independence from the Governor based on what they believed – that in emergencies, the Governor has no control over them.

It didn’t take long for Governor Sisolak and Attorney General Aaron Ford to make a stern announcement that the four counties have no power to reject a statewide command stemming from the Covid-19 pandemic emergency.  That’s a job for governors and attorneys general.

Later in the day it appeared that the four counties began to soften their claim that they had 100% power over themselves during an emergency.  But state officials spent a big part of their day warning Lyon County and the others that they were not going to win this one.

This is an ongoing issue.  It may not be quite over yet,

Medicaid Clients: Here’s your ticket to ride!


        Corona Virus

Transportation available for Nevada Medicaid clients seeking COVID-19 vaccine and testing

CARSON CITY — Helping to prepare your friend or loved one to get the Covid-19 vaccine or testing can be an awkward time for Nevadans who are already struggling due to the pandemic.  Figuring out various methods for getting the vaccine, when it is available, can be even more challenging. Nevada Medicaid is asking Nevadans to plan ahead by knowing how to schedule a vaccine appointment and lining up their transportation.

 Health officials say many Nevadans – especially older Nevadans – may not be aware of how easy it is to get vaccinated against the virus.

Nevada Medicaid is offering Medicaid recipients a flexible same-day transportation service with a variety of options including gas mileage reimbursement, bank card funding to take the bus, and, in most instances, same-day rides from ride services.

Information is available in English and Spanish here under Appointment Resources or by calling 1-844-879-7341.

Here’s how to plan ahead:

Step one: Check NVCovidFighter.org daily to find out when and where vaccines may be available in your county and schedule an appointment.

Step two: Plan transportation. The flyer, available here, describes who is eligible for transportation through Medicaid and how to schedule their ride

Step three: Get the vaccine and continue social distancing, frequent hand washing and mask-wearing.

Step four: Plan transportation for the second dose of the vaccine.

It is always Open Enrollment for Nevada Medicaid. Apply at https://accessnevada.dwss.nv.gov/. Non-citizens and the uninsured can receive COVID-19 services through federally qualified health centers here.

Do you know who this suspected thief is?

Suspected thief stealing merchandise according to CCSO

Carson City Sheriff’s Detectives are trying to track down this individual who is accused of burglarizing and stealing valuable equipment from Harbor Freight in north Carson City.

Store employees said Sunday afternoon a male suspect made off with two Predator generators from Harbor Freight at 2749 North Carson Street. Deputies say a witness followed the suspect and photographed him. Harbor Freight employees also told detectives that it appeared to be the same suspect from prior thefts of generators and welders from the store.

Anyone with information or questions is encouraged to contact the Carson City Sheriff’s Dispatch Center at  (775) 887-2677, Investigation Division, Detective Sam Hatley (775) 283-7852, Investigations Sgt. Craig Lowe (775) 283-7815 or Secret Witness (775) 322-4900. Refer to Case No. 2021-640.

Police arrest man stealing merchandise in a big way

Carson City and Sparks Home Depot and Lowe’s stores were reportedly burglarized by 47 year old Brent Akers of Sparks.  Police say Akers would enter a store and put large boxes of merchandise in his shopping cart and then head for the check-out line.  Akers had earlier opened the boxes and stuffed very expensive merchandise inside them hoping the cashier wouldn’t notice them.

On one occasion in Carson City at a Home Depot an alert cashier looked deep inside one of the merchandise boxes and discovered expensive tools and electronic devices  At that point Akers immediately left the scene, got into his pickup and headed for home in Sparks. 

It’s not well known how many burglary attempts Akers made in the Reno-Carson City area but when police said he struck again at a Lowe’s store in Sparks he got caught – again.  He was followed home by law enforcement, stopped and arrested.  Akers was charged with Commercial Burglary and Attempted Grand Larceny and found himself in custody of Sparks Police.

Lyon County Population Grows Past Carson City

Population of Counties in Nevada as of 2020

In 2020, the most populous county in Nevada was Clark County, home of Las Vegas, with 2,231,647 residents. This represents population growth of 14.29% since the 2010 census. After Clark County is Washoe County (465,735) including the city of Reno.  Washoe is the only other Nevada county with more than 100,000 residents.

Other major counties in Nevada include Lyon County with an estimated population of 60,904 with a growth rate of 2.87% over the past year – 17% over the last 10 years.  Lyon County is now the 3rd largest county in Nevada.  Other 2020 population numbers: Carson City (55,414), Elko County (52,460), Douglas County (48,467), and Nye County (45,336). All of these counties experienced positive growth since the the 2020 census, again, led by Clark County.

Nevada Counties with Fewest Residents

All but two counties in Nevada have fewer than 60,000 residents. The least populated county in Nevada is Esmeralda County in the west with a population of 826 and no incorporated towns. Other small counties include Eureka County (2,003), Storey County (4,029), Mineral County (4,514), Lincoln County (5,201), and Lander County (5,575). Of these counties, Esmeralda County experienced the most growth at 5.36% while Mineral County experienced the most decline, minus 5.68% since the 2010 census.

Nevada Counties with Rapid Growth

Clark County, Nevada experienced the most rapid growth in the state since the census, growing 14.29%. Other counties that have experienced rapid growth include Washoe County (10.37%), Lyon County (7.23%), Elko County (6.88%), and Esmeralda County (5.36%). The county with the most decline since the census is Mineral County (-5.68%) followed by White Pine County (-5.50%).

Growth Since 2010
Clark County 2,347,920 20.25%
Washoe County 485,849 15.14%
Lyon County 60,904 17.02%
Carson City 57,344 4.30%
Elko County 53,256 8.49%
Douglas County 49,737 5.74%
Nye County 49,197 12.21%
Churchill County 25,715 3.61%
Humboldt County 16,937 2.13%
White Pine County 9,660 -3.66%
Pershing County 6,805 1.01%
Lander County 5,502 -5.06%
Lincoln County 5,075 -5.16%
Mineral County 4,427 -7.50%
Storey County 4,407 10.26%
Eureka County 2,091 5.08%
Esmeralda County 965 23.09%

Covid-19’s Toll on Our Quad Counties

Quad-County COVID-19 Update: 4 Deaths, 27 New Cases, and 106 Recoveries  

Carson City Health and Human Services (CCHHS) is reporting 4 additional deaths due to COVID-19 in the Quad-County Region. The individuals were:

  • A male Carson City resident in his 70’s
  • A male Carson City resident in his 60’s
  • A male Carson City resident in his 50’s
  • A male Lyon County resident in his 90’s

CCHHS is also reporting 27 new cases and 106 additional recoveries of COVID-19 in the Quad-County Region. This brings the total number of cases to 10,723, with 6,761 recoveries and 188 deaths; 3,774 cases remain active.

Total Cases Active Cases Recoveries Deaths *Population
Carson City 5689 2091 3493 105 56,546
Douglas County 2376 801 1547 28 49,695
Lyon County 2587 868 1666 53 57,987
Storey County 71 14 55 2 4,465
Quad-County 10723 3774 6761 188 168,693

*Population information taken from the Nevada Health Response Dashboard found at https://nvhealthresponse.nv.gov/

View the Quad-County COVID-19 dashboard at https://gethealthycarsoncity.org/novel-coronavirus-2019/ .

 CCHHS COVID-19 Vaccinations

Vaccine statistics are updated weekly on Tuesday. These are the doses received and administered by CCHHS ONLY. This does not include other vaccinations by other entities in the Quad-County Region. As of January 25th, 2021

  • Doses received: 7,175
  • Doses administered: 7,041

Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing for Quad-County Residents

Testing is for Quad-County (Carson City, Douglas, Lyon, and Storey County) residents ONLY, all others will be turned away. Events may be canceled 48 hours in advance if inclement weather is expected. Testing is free of charge, no appointments or reservations. To view all upcoming February events visit  https://gethealthycarsoncity.org/events/.

Date Time Location
2/03/2021 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Douglas County Community Center

1329 Waterloo Ln, Gardnerville

2/04/2021 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Fernley City Hall

595 Silver Lace Blvd, Fernley

For those who are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 or have questions, call the Quad-County COVID-19 Hotline Monday through Friday, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. Spanish speakers are available. The phone number is (775) 434-1988.

 

 

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