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Carson City C-Hill’s big letter “C” is back up and quite visible, but…

Restored beautifully except for one minor thing…

 

Carson City’s C-Hill “C” is back up but many townspeople would like the “C” to stand out a little brighter like the one that was changed to symbolically mourn the death of a local high school student.

Volunteers showed up this past weekend to re-arrange the rocks to restore the giant “C” that had stared down at the town for decades from near the top of the hill.  And they did a very fine job.  But many citizens would prefer that the rocks get a good coating of white paint to fully restore the brightness of the city symbol that has been an iconic element on Carson City’s west side.

We’ll see if they do it.  A hand-pump sprayer would probably have it done in a couple of hours. But the labor to haul the paint up there will likely be on the same time scale.  Unless they fool us all. 

The “C” restoration is a project of Carson High School Senior Gabe Crossman at Carson High School who is also an Eagle Scout of Boy Scout Troop 45.  The effort also qualified as a senior project toward his high school diploma.

Intermittent smokey skies for NW Nevada today

From the National Weather Service Office

.DENSE SMOKE ADVISORY IN EFFECT UNTIL 11 PM PDT THIS EVENING FOR
LOCATIONS FROM AROUND HALLELUJAH JUNCTION TO NEAR SUSANVILLE...

The National Weather Service in Reno has issued a Dense Smoke
Advisory, which is in effect until 11 PM PDT this evening.

* Visibility: Generally 1-3 miles except for locations from
  Hallelujah Junction to near Herlong along Highway 395 where
  visibility may be less than 1/2 mile at times.

* Impacts: Low visibility could create hazardous driving
  conditions along Highway 395 depending on how active the Walker
  Fire is burning. Air quality will be severely degraded in areas
  of dense smoke.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

Slow down and increase distance between vehicles when driving
through areas of dense smoke as visibility could be severely
degraded to below 1/2 mile at times. Headlights should be turned
on as well. Those sensitive to smoke should take precautions as
air quality will be severely degraded. Healthy individuals should
limit exposure as well. 

Bad wreck on Highway 50 at SLT at Sawmill late Saturday morning – Highway 50 reopened

Courtesy photos

The California Highway Patrol reports that a collision between a truck hauling fuel and possibly a Prius car caused a huge explosion and fire on a Highway 50 bridge heading south out of South Lake Tahoe Saturday afternoon.  Reports from the scene indicated that a portion of the burning fuel got into the creek and that the truck driver perished in the fire.

Highway 50 WAS closed in both directions for a time.  Highway 50 has since been re-opened.

Motorcycle crash atop Spooner on Highway 50 kills one

A motorcycle crash atop Spooner Summit Saturday night killed the passenger and injured the driver.    The victim was transported down Highway 50 to Carson City’s Emergency Landing Area at the foot of Highway 50 at Highway 395.  

Paramedics and Care Flight personnel helped load the injured motorcyclist into the chopper.

Moments later the chopper lifted off for a quick trip to Renown in Reno.  

Carson City Schools adding two more law enforcement officers to schools

Carson City Sheriff Ken Furlong announced to the Carson City Board of Supervisors this morning that the Carson City School District has received a grant to expand the number of law enforcement officers stationed at Carson City Schools.  Currently there are three – it’s going to five officers.

It’s been a horrendous experience for a number of school districts around the country to be subjected to gun violence.  Psychologists have been very vocal about the mental stress it’s put on students, their families, teachers and administrators nationwide about these mindless, deadly attacks.

CarsonCityJournal.com contacted Sheriff Kenneth Furlong who described the program in some detail.  First off, two new officers will be added to the other three.  It will give schools greater law enforcement “presence” and thereby more confidence that there is greater attention paid to suspected troubled students – both perpetrators and victims – with emphasis in Carson City’s two middle schools.

Sheriff Furlong indicated it will take a few weeks – maybe a little more – to get everything in place, adding that law enforcement will be able to discover “troubled” young teens earlier and get them the help they need.

This story is evolving.  Many updates to follow in the weeks and months ahead.

 

CC Supervisors stalls approval of 100 home project on Race Track – Supervisors move ahead on affordable housing on Butti

Schulz Ranch Phase 4
CCPD graphic

The Carson City Supervisors failed to approve 100 new homes on the east side of Carson City on Race Track off Bigelow. The project lacks some easement approvals for drainage.  The homes will be on relatively small lots off Bigelow, bordering Cone Peak.  The issue comes back hopefully for resolution at the Supervisors next board meeting in two weeks.

Butti Way near Parks and Recreation Department.

The Supervisors also began consideration for a 160 unit apartment project labeled as affordable/work force housing for low income families in Carson City. It’s a little ways out into the future but could contain up to 160 families with rental rates that are quite affordable. Various developers will be eventually submitting bids on which developer can come up with the best deal for the city and its citizens.

The Supervisors decided to further formulate a path for a developer who will eventually emerge as the one to build it. Final selection of the developer is expected to occur at the November 21st Supervisors’ meeting.  Preparation for such a big project will take some time to get through all the red tape and conditions.  Construction could be as much as two years down the road.  There will be several tiers of tenant eligibility from a few “market rate” units up to 30%, 60% and 80% of market rate.

Look and truly see if there is something coming…

Black pickup headed west on 5th….

A small white car pulled out from a stop sign on Curry and hit the pickup broadside.

The northbound car, who had a stop sign, slammed into the side of the pickup causing lots of damage. Neither driver was injured.

A woman in a small sedan was stopped facing north at Fifth and Curry Wednesday afternoon. When she pulled out, Carson City Deputies say she did so right into the path of a pickup headed west on 5th. The pickup was damaged and its left rear tire was flattened. Damage to the sedan was extensive. Neither the lady driver of the car nor the driver of the pickup were not injured.

Lightning Strike near China Springs Camp

3:30 pm – Douglas County Fire is trying to track down what appeared to be a lightning strike in the China Springs Road area.  Thus far they can’t find anything – smoke or otherwise.  Residents should keep an eye and ear out for lightning strikes that are forecasted for the area, throughout the evening.

Report of a man waving a gun on Hot Springs proves false report

Carson City Sheriff’s Deputies were called to some apartment buildings at 609 Hot Springs Road Tuesday evening on a report of a man outside Apartment 109 waving a gun.  Witnesses told deputies that he was standing in the parking lot – white male, about 6 foot, wearing a green shirt and green shorts.

Upon arrival, deputies quickly learned that there was a a report of a man wearing a holstered pistol which never left the holster.  So, with that, deputies resumed their normal patrol duties.

Democratic Party stops early telephone voting in Iowa and Nevada presidential caucuses – security problems.

Internet security concerns have prompted the Democratic National Committee to reverse course on offering a telephone voting option in 2020’s presidential caucuses in Iowa and Nevada. But those key early states may find another way for voters not present at February caucuses to take part—possibly by voting early at voting centers.

The DNC’s announcement on Friday came a week after the DNC held its summer meeting, where its Rules and Bylaws Committee (RBC) continued reviewing each state’s 2020 plans. The DNC technology staff, an advisory panel, and the RBC co-chairs concluded that there was too great a risk of ill-intentioned outsiders disrupting the “virtual voting” process that Iowa and Nevada had hoped to offer voters to increase participation.

“The statement will go into some detail on the views of the security and computer technicians at the DNC and their outside advisory panel. It will cite strongly the Senate Intelligence Committee report on Russian activity,” James Roosevelt Jr., the longtime RBC co-chair, said Friday.

Iowa, the first contest, and Nevada, the third contest, had been developing a telephone-based ballot—as well as related systems that registered voters, authenticated identity, counted votes and reported results—to increase participation beyond precinct caucuses.

“The DNC technology people are very skeptical about whether a reasonably safe system can be constructed,” Harold Ickes, a longtime RBC member, referring to online voting, said a week ago at the DNC summer meeting. “And point two, forget the technology, what if it melts down? What if the management of it doesn’t work?”

While there was much consternation—mostly aired in closed sessions—the Rules Committee faced a mid-September deadline to approve how the state parties running caucuses, which also include Alaska, Hawaii, Kansas and Wyoming, will offer a way for voters to remotely participate. That inclusionary mandate was part of the post-2016 Unity Reform Commission report, which “requires absentee voting,” and its 2020 Delegate Selection Rules.

Roosevelt said the Rules Committee will hold a special meeting after Labor Day to formally vote on the recommendation to reject virtual voting in Iowa and issue a waiver that essentially would revert to the process used in 2016. An early voting or vote-by-mail alternative was being studied, although it might impinge on New Hampshire’s first-in-the-nation primary.

In Nevada, the alternative appears to be using early voting centers and special precincts on the Las Vegas strip. When asked what Nevada might do if it could not get approval for its virtual voting plan, its lone RBC member, Artie Blanco, replied that Nevada also planned four days of early voting.

Wyoming was also planning on using early voting centers. Hawaii was considering mailing ballots to registered Democrats. Alaska, in contrast, was still seeking to use a smartphone system that West Virginia and Denver have piloted for overseas military and civilian voters, as state party officials said cell phone service was more reliable than mail in rural areas where many Native Americans live.

Good Intentions, Gnarly Details

The goal of expanding participation in 2020’s caucuses goes back to healing the party’s splits from the 2016 presidential campaign. In its December 2017 report, the Unity Reform Commission said any caucus-state should help people who could not be physically present to participate. Those voters include the elderly, shift-workers, people with disabilities, young adults and even college students.

A year later, the Rules Committee issued 2020 Delegate Selection Rules that built on the reform panel’s report. These rules said that “The casting of ballots over the Internet may be used as a method of voting” in caucuses. The rules also required caucus states to create a paper record trail for audits or recounts. Its members are the DNC’s procedural experts. They are not technologists. The RBC left it to state parties to fill in the details, and further relied on DNC technology, cybersecurity and voter protection staff to critique each state’s 2020 plans.

The virtual voting plans worked out by Iowa and Nevada were not the same, but they shared features. Both states wanted to use a telephone keypad for a voter to rank their presidential preferences. The ranking is intended to emulate the in-person caucus process, where participants vote in rounds as candidates are disqualified. (Candidates must receive 15 percent of the vote to be viable.)

A virtual caucus participant would have to register beforehand. They would receive instructions by email, including a log-in and PIN number. Certain dates and time windows would be open for virtual voting. Voters would dial in and hear recordings where candidates were listed in alphabetical order. They would enter numerical choices on their keypad to rank them, like paying a bill by phone.

Iowa divided all of its virtual voters into four precincts, one for each of its House districts. These votes would be tallied and added to the in-person precinct totals from the rest of the state. However, the virtual votes would only be awarded 10 percent of the night’s delegates. (As of this writing, the RBC has not yet approved that allocation.)

Nevada, in contrast, was more ambitious. It planned to give 1,700 precinct caucus chairs an app to let them announce the early voting results to people in the room, and then to report the in-person votes to party headquarters. A vendor would do the math combining the virtual and precinct totals for awarding delegates to the process’s next stage. (In June’s RBC meeting, Nevada party officials said that app was still under development.)

Both states had won conditional Rules Committee approval. However, final approval was dependent on having the DNC staff signing off on the systems to be deployed, as well as the committee approving the delegate allocation formula, and judging that any new process would be well-run. Suffice it to say that despite determined efforts by Iowa and Nevada state party officials, the DNC’s staff has so far not had completed voting systems before it to fully evaluate.

When the RBC met in July in Washington, it discussed the status of these virtual voting systems at a closed breakfast—but not in the open session. After meeting for five-plus hours on August 22, the panel was set to adjourn without discussing virtual voting states, when Ken Martin—DNC vice chair, Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party chairman, and president of the Association of State Democratic Chairs—spoke up.

“I want to be very careful in how I say this, but I want to express a deep, deep frustration on behalf of my colleagues in three very important states,” he said, referring to Iowa, Nevada and Alaska. “This is the third meeting we have now asked them to come to. They’ve incurred incredible expense to bring their teams too. And we put them on the tail end of a meeting, which we knew was going to go long, and leave no time for a very important conversation.”

At that point, Roosevelt replied that there were closed meetings scheduled the following day with RBC members, DNC staff and party officials from the three states. “And I actually have more data that I would like to share with this committee in executive session as soon as we adjourn,” he said. The committee emptied the hearing room.

According to a report first published by Yahoo and Bloomberg, “the DNC [staff] told the panel that experts convened by the party [technology staff] were able to hack into a conference call among the [Rules] committee, the Iowa Democratic Party and Nevada Democratic Party, raising concerns about teleconferencing for virtual caucuses.” It continued, “The test and the revelation of hacking enraged party officials in caucus states who say the systems were not fully built and the hack of a general teleconferencing system is not comparable.”

Earlier in the week, the RBC, DNC tech staff, caucus state officials and vendors had a series of conference calls on security issues and to demonstrate certain system elements, said Roosevelt afterward.

RBC members later asked to confirm whether the DNC staff had hacked its own conference call would not comment. A contractor working with one caucus state said they had heard a rumor about the purported hack. An outside computer scientist critical of any online voting said the state party officials were correct; hacking conference calls was not the same as hacking a voting system.

However, it didn’t appear to matter. Showing the possibility of a hack, or even making the accusation, highlighted this approach’s vulnerability. Meanwhile, the larger takeaway among many RBC members was that debuting telephone voting was premature.

“Our tech team basically said that there was no company that can do this,” one member said, recounting the executive session.

Needless to say, Iowa and Nevada officials were upset. Committee members were also divided. Some said that the risks were too great to debut virtual voting in 2020’s early caucuses. Others said these states were doing what they had been told under the 2020 rules.

Looking for Alternatives

After that executive session, the RBC co-chairs, DNC staff and the caucus state party officials held more closed meetings. Those meetings continued this past week, culminating in Friday’s announcement to back off from virtual voting in Iowa. That decision was not unexpected.

As the dust settled at the DNC summer meeting, the sense gathered from hallway interviews was that the Rules Committee co-chairs were looking at other ways to expand participation, especially in Iowa. It appeared that a mix of voting by mail and/or early voting centers might be an alternative, if it didn’t conflict with the New Hampshire primary process.

Nevada’s RBC member, Artie Blanco, said her state already was planning on offering four days of early voting before the February 22 caucus. (Any voter would have to register several weeks beforehand.) Iowa, in contrast, did not anticipate offering an early voting option in its 2020 plan.

It would be premature to conclude that remote participation in 2020’s party-run caucuses will not occur. The Rules Committee has a history of looking for ways to meet their goals. It will be meeting after Labor Day, where it is expected to finalize the early caucus states’ plans, including possibly having early voting centers or a vote-by-mail option.

Steven Rosenfeld is the editor and chief correspondent of Voting Booth, a project of the Independent Media Institute. He has reported for National Public Radio, Marketplace, and Christian Science Monitor Radio, as well as a wide range of progressive publications including Salon, AlterNet, the American Prospect, and many others.

Man suffering medical emergency off Flint Road, near V&T tracks, probably had his life saved by two men passing by…

Man found in bad shape off isolated Fitch Road. Two latino men stopped to help. They called 9-1-1. Victim loaded into Ambulance which rushed him to CTRMC.
Deputies made sure there was no foul play. They talked at length with the latino good samaritans.

Sheriff’s Deputies and OSP Troopers compared notes again, everyone returned to their patrol duties.

Attempted murder on South Carson – she survived, he’s in jail

Attempted Murder Scene
31-hundred block of South Carson Street Sunday.

Sergeant monitors while officers apprehend suspect.

Carson City Sheriff’s Deputies converged on a dwelling in the 31-hundred block of South Carson Street Sunday.  Upon arrival deputies discovered a brutal domestic violence incident – the female victim with a head injury and a stab wound to her neck – her accused assailant, James Bricky, 42,  covered in blood. 

Deputies managed to get the female victim out and transported to a Reno Trauma Unit.  Officers say Bricky was still hold-up inside, refusing to come out.  Eventually he surrendered.  Bricky, who has a long criminal record in California and Nevada, was arrested for attempted murder – due his stabbing his victim in the neck.  Bricky was also arrested for illegal possession of a gun and domestic battery with the use of a deadly weapon.

Bricky is being held in the Carson City Jail with a court appearance scheduled later this week.

The Nevada DMV doesn’t issue traffic tickets – beware of a scam!

The Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles is warning motorists about a speeding ticket scam that has surfaced in Nevada..

On-line scammers are sending out emails, claiming to be from the DMV, about traffic violations that can only be paid online with a credit card.

The emails demand payment of a fine within 72 hours and contain links for “EasyPay” or to contest the citation.

HOWEVER! The Nevada DMV does not issue traffic citations or collect fines, according to Director Julie Butler.

“It’s unfortunate that these criminals are posing as the DMV to scam innocent people,” Butler said.  “Don’t click on the links. The scammers are after your personal information and your device could be infected with malware.”

Citations in Nevada are written by law enforcement officers and handled in municipal courts. Nevada does not have any automated systems for traffic enforcement. Motorists are never notified of a violation by email.

Thieves and Scammers never sleep…

The Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles is warning motorists about a speeding ticket scam that has surfaced in Nevada..

On-line scammers are sending out emails, claiming to be from the DMV, about traffic violations that can only be paid online with a credit card.

The emails demand payment of a fine within 72 hours and contain links for “EasyPay” or to contest the citation.

HOWEVER! The Nevada DMV does not issue traffic citations or collect fines, according to Director Julie Butler.

“It’s unfortunate that these criminals are posing as the DMV to scam innocent people,” Butler said.  “Don’t click on the links. The scammers are after your personal information and your device could be infected with malware.”

Citations in Nevada are written by law enforcement officers and handled in municipal courts. Nevada does not have any automated systems for traffic enforcement. Motorists are never notified of a violation by email.

Don’t fall for “false” DMV traffic ticket scam…

 

The Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles is warning motorists about a speeding ticket scam that has surfaced in Nevada.

Hackers are sending out emails supposedly from the DMV, about traffic violations that can only be paid online with a credit card.

The emails demand payment of a fine within three days and contain links for “EasyPay” or to contest the citation.

The Nevada DMV does not issue traffic citations or collect fines, according to Director Julie Butler.  “It’s unfortunate that these criminals are posing as the DMV to scam innocent people,” Butler said.  “Don’t click on the links. The scammers are after your personal information and your device could be infected with malware.”

Citations in Nevada are written by law enforcement officers and handled in municipal courts. Nevada does not have any automated systems for traffic enforcement. Motorists are never notified of a violation by email.

Large roller door collapses near entrance to Carson City Costco – 1 worker badly injured

Costco rolling door partly collapses. Worker badly injured.

Worker is rushed by ambulance to an awaiting Careflight Air Ambulance. Care Flight lands but patient goes critical. Care Flight crew manages to restablize the victim. They work on him for the better part of a half-hour.

Injured Costco worker is loaded aboard Care Flight chopper bound for Renown Medical Center in Reno.

Careflight launches for a quick flight to Renown. No information released on victim’s condition.

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