Select Page

Weather Carson City Nevada

 

 

audiology title=

barrelhead

 

prp

oceancreek

Coast Tree

Sema Roofing

wandr

occc

audiology title=

barrelhead

prp

oceancreek

Coast Tree

Sema Roofing

wandr

occc

barrelhead


 

Coast Tree

Carson City’s Living Nativity – Musser and Division under construction…

Work has begun on building the Living Nativity in Carson City. It is the 21st year that the street of Musser and Division has been transformed into Jesus’ birthplace in Bethlehem.  Community members are invited to experience the sight, sounds and emotions of the Living Nativity on Saturday and Sunday, December 11-12, from 6:30-7:30 pm.

Volunteers play the roles of Cesar Augustus, Joseph, Mary, the innkeepers, wise men, shepherds and angels. Livestock, including donkeys, sheep, and a cow, also bring the story of Jesus’ birth to life. Volunteers are also helping to construct the Living Nativity, including guests of the Night Off the Streets warming shelter.  “The Living Nativity is the church’s gift to the community,” says Reverend Maggie McNaught, Pastor of the Carson City First United Methodist Church.

The reenactment, and the story of Jesus’ birth itself, has a message of hope even when enduring hardship. “This is a timely message given the community’s challenges these past two years with COVID disease and economic hardships,” says Tannis Causey, who is spearheading the Living Nativity.

The drive-through entrance begins at King and Division Streets in Carson City.
There is no charge for visiting the Living Nativity. Donations of non-perishable food will be accepted to help feed those in need.

For more information, go to www.carson1umc.com

Unlimited Entertainment from Carson City Symphony Association

Carson City Symphony’s Youth Strings and

Joyful Noise Carson Children’s Choir present

“LatinXpressions III,” Thursday, December 9

Symphony Youth Strings and Joyful Noise Carson Children’s Choir, after-school educational programs of the Carson City Symphony Association, present “LatinXpressions III” on Thursday, December 9, at 6:30 p.m. at the Carson City Community Center, 851 E. William St., Carson City.  Admission is free. Masks are required for audience and performers.

String players from Carson City and surrounding areas, including public-, private-, and home-schooled students, grades 3 to 12, will play music in Mexican, Brazilian, and Argentinian styles.  Singers ages 4 to 12 will join them in two songs and sing three that feature percussion instruments, rhythm sticks, castanets, and claves.

The concert was programmed by Carson City Symphony Association’s Education Director Sue Jesch and is conducted by Associate Concertmaster/Youth String Instructor Laura Gibson.  It features about 50 students playing string instruments, including beginning violinists in their first performance and three ensembles: Allegro, level one; Vivace, intermediate; and STRAZZ, advanced. Michelle Powers is Director of the Joyful Noise Children’s Choir.


Our Music Events this Month

  • Tuesday, Dec. 7, 6:30 p.m. at Carson City Community Center. Carson City School Orchestras Holiday Concert. Masks required. Free.

  • Thursday, Dec. 9, noon, at Carson Mall. Not Quite Ready for Carnegie Hall Players (NQR) adult intermediate string ensemble. Free.

  • Thursday, Dec. 9, 6:30 p.m., LatinXpressions III concert at Carson City Community Center. Symphony Youth Strings and Joyful Noise Carson Children’s Choir. Masks required. Free.

  • Sunday, Dec. 12, 4:00 p.m., Holiday Treat Concert at Carson City Community Center. Carson City Symphony, Carson Chamber Singers, Victorian Dancers, and Joyful Noise Carson Children’s Choir. Lobby entertainment 3:00 p.m. by Consort Canzona Early Music Instrumental Ensemble. Masks required. Tickets $18/$15/free age 18 and under. Get tickets at CCSymphony.com.

  • Tuesday, Dec. 14, 3:30 p.m. at Carson Mall. Silver Strings ensemble plays holiday music. Free.

    Thursday, Dec. 16, 11:00 a.m. at Carson City Senior Center. Not Quite Ready for Carnegie Hall Players (NQR) adult intermediate string ensemble. Masks required. Free.


  • Friday, Dec. 17, 4:00 p.m., Christmas Carol Playalong for Strings at Carson Mall. NQR and all interested violin, viola, cello, and bass players welcome. Call 775- 450-5584 for sheet music in advance. Free for participants and audience.

Carson City Symphony Association’s programs are supported in part by grants from the Carson City Cultural Commission, the Nevada Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts, and private donations. 

Youth Strings and Youth Choir present “Latin Expressions III” concert Dec. 9

How notable virtuosos start out….

Carson City Symphony’s Youth Strings and
Joyful Noise Carson Children’s Choir present
“LatinXpressions III,” Thursday, December 9

Symphony Youth Strings and Joyful Noise Carson Children’s Choir, after-school educational programs of the Carson City Symphony Association, present “LatinXpressions III” on Thursday, December 9, at 6:30 p.m. at the Carson City Community Center, 851 E. William St., Carson City. Admission is free. Masks are required for audience and performers

String players from Carson City and surrounding areas, including public-, private-, and home-schooled students, grades 3 to 12, will perform music in Mexican, Brazilian, and Argentinian styles. Singers ages 4 to 12 will join them in two songs and sing three that feature percussion instruments, rhythm sticks, castanets, and claves.

The concert was programmed by Carson City Symphony Association’s Education Director Sue Jesch and is conducted by Associate Concertmaster/Youth String Instructor Laura Gibson. It features about 50 students playing string instruments, including beginning violinists in their first performance and three ensembles: Allegro, level one; Vivace, intermediate; and STRAZZ, advanced. Michelle Powers is Director of the Joyful Noise Children’s Choir.

Carson City Symphony Association’s programs are supported in part by grants from the Carson City Cultural Commission, the Nevada Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts, and private donations. For more information, call director Sue Jesch at 775-450-5584.

Sea Otter saved by an Oregon Coast Aquarium Employee

Injured Sea Otter Receives Loving Care at Oregon Coast Aquarium

Injured Sea Otter…possibly wounded by a shark…rescued by an OCA employee

An injured sea otter that was hauled ashore on Cobble Beach at the Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area is now under assessment and care at the Oregon Coast Aquarium (OCAq) in Newport.

The sea otter was observed hauled ashore by Chief Park Ranger Jay Moeller, who then alerted Oregon Coast Aquarium staff. After receiving authorization from the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, OCAq staff coordinated with Jim Rice of the Marine Mammal Stranding Network to retrieve the animal and transport it to the Aquarium for triage and immediate care.

Dr. Dan Lewer (of Willamette Veterinary Hospital) views an X-ray of the injured sea otter

During retrieval, staff observed that the sea otter had limited mobility, poor fur quality, and multiple wounds. After it was transported to OCAq, staff determined the sea otter to be an adult male, weighing about 64 pounds. Staff noted he was emaciated; a sea otter of his size should weigh between 75 and 85 pounds.

While the sea otter was under anesthesia, staff was able to thoroughly examine the animal. It was determined he suffered lacerations and puncture wounds prior to being hauled ashore, one of which was close to a vertebrae, likely causing his reduced mobility. While the exact cause of the damage is unknown, the injuries are consistent with those of a shark bite. The sea otter is currently being treated for infection and husbandry and veterinary staff will continue to monitor the very lucky sea otter.

While he is alert and accepting food, his prognosis remains guarded. OCAq staff are limiting human interaction as much as possible in order to mitigate any stress to the otter and potentially prepare him for release.

“The next few days will be critical for his recovery and we hope to see his odds improve daily, but it is too early to predict this,” said OCAq’s Director of Husbandry Jim Burke. “Our veterinary and rehab staff will do all we can to act quickly to improve his chances of release back into the wild.”

Staff prepare the injured sea otter for intubation

The Aquarium is one of three wildlife rehabilitation facilities in the Pacific Northwest, and the only one in Oregon, authorized by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to provide specialized care to endangered marine life, including sea otters. To accommodate increased marine life rescue and improve conditions for ongoing care and rehabilitation, the Aquarium plans to build a Marine Rehabilitation Center for animal husbandry and veterinary staff to provide critical care to injured or stranded marine wildlife.

Sea otters disappeared from Oregon in the early 1900s, as they were hunted to support the fur industry. While there is no longer an established population off the Oregon coast, individuals from Washington populations have been spotted in Oregon waters. These individuals are typically males traveling along the coast in search of potential mates.

“This sea otter means a lot to many of us Oregonians,” said OCAq’s Curator of Marine Mammals Brittany Blades. “I never thought I would get to see a live sea otter living on the Oregon Coast until 3 weeks ago when I saw this otter swimming, foraging and sleeping around Yaquina Head.”

If you see a sea otter in Oregon waters or on Oregon beaches, note its location and report it to the Oregon State Police Tipline at 800-452-7888, the Marine Mammal Stranding Network at 1-866-767-6114, or the Oregon Coast Aquarium at 541-867-3474.

Great Job Guys!!!

 

Broaden your horizons at Western Nevada Community College

Learning won’t stop between the end of fall semester and the start of spring semester at Western Nevada College.  Winter session provides students with the opportunity to take accelerated online courses in three and five week increments for full credit.

Register now for 5-week classes that begin on Dec. 20 and end on Jan. 21 and three-week courses that start on Jan. 3 and end on Jan. 21. View winter session classes at wnc.edu/class-schedule/. Classes are offered in Art, Biology, Core Humanities, Education, English, Environmental Science, History, Information Systems, Management Science, Mathematics and Sociology.

It’s the swapping of the K-9’s down at the Sheriff’s Office!!

K9 Tico’s Retirement
Deputy Jimmy Surratt

                                  New K-9 replacement is K-9 Cash with Deputy Jon Tripp

Sheriff Ken Furlong is happy to announce K9 Tico’s Retirement! Tico turned 10 years old in September this year, and he will now get to spend his golden years relaxing at home with his handler, Deputy Jimmy Surratt. Tico’s service to this community began in April of 2016, and his official retirement date is December 2nd. Over his nearly six-year career, Tico amassed a whopping 736 K9 sniffs and patrol deployments. He worked on patrol, visited our schools to keep our children safe, and topped off his contributions in the Special Enforcement Team. Deputy Surratt should also be commended, as he topped off an extensive K9 career with Tico as his 3rd dog. Deputy Surratt remains with the Sheriff’s Office and continues to safeguard our community in the patrol division.

As Tico hits the links, we also welcome the newest addition to the Carson City Canine Unit, K9 Cash! Cash is an 18-month-old Belgian Malinois, and he successfully completed K9 school this week. His handler, Deputy Jon Tripp, also has previous K9 experience, and the two of them will be patrolling your neighborhoods before the start of this new year.

Please join us in congratulating Deputy Jimmy Surratt & K9 Tico on a stout K9 career and well-deserved retirement, and welcome our newest community member, K9 Cash with Deputy Jon Tripp! P.S. – we welcome all puns and references to Johnny/Cash….

barrelhead


Coast Tree

flocs

Coast Tree

flocs

Coast Tree

flocs