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Nevada Tobacco Prevention Coalition

The Nevada Tobacco Prevention Coalition brought together experts from throughout the state last month to discuss the dangers of youth vaping, and what parents and other adults can do to protect them from this dangerous and addictive substance.

At the end of the presentation, State Senator Julia Ratti recognized the importance of the problem by declaring January 26, “Youth Vaping Prevention and Awareness Day.”

“Youth vaping has skyrocketed over the past several years and in 2019 our state lawmakers recognized the need to reduce youth use of vape products and prevent additional youth from starting,” said NTPC President Kelli Goatley-Seals. “With the funding designated by lawmakers, NTPC has worked with national and statewide leaders in vaping prevention to develop a campaign to educate youth and adults about the short-term and long-term dangers of using vape products.”

There has been a more than 45 percent increase (between 2017-2019) in teens reporting they have vaped in the last thirty days, according to findings from the 2019 Nevada Youth Risk Behavior Survey. UNR researchers found that 22.5 percent of teens had vaped in the last 30 days, compared to 15.5 percent in 2017, and in certain counties within the northern and rural regions of Nevada, prevalence rates were above 36 percent.

Go here for the panel discussion video.

Hidden Dangers of Vaping
The vaping industry continues to manipulate teens into thinking that vapes are harmless. According to studies:
Many electronic vapor products heat liquids that contain nicotine, the same drug that makes cigarettes addictive. “When e-cigarettes first became popular in the U.S. about seven or eight years ago, most delivered very little nicotine to the user,” explained Jennifer Pearson, PhD, MPH, an assistant professor at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). “But now, a lot of e-cigarettes use a different formulation – a nicotine salt solution — that makes the nicotine much more bio-available. People who use these nicotine salt solution e-cigarettes have blood nicotine concentrations that look a lot like they’re smoking cigarettes.”

Youth are more at risk for addiction to the nicotine contained in vapes because their brains are still developing, leading to other addictions such as cigarettes.

The exposure of a young brain to nicotine can cause mood disorders and permanently lower impulse control.
Vapes aren’t just “water vapor.” The aerosol from vapes contains ultrafine particles, heavy metals and other chemicals that can damage a teen’s lungs. “In my own research, the most common symptoms that teens mention from vaping is wheezing and coughing, which they say have done things like hurt their performance in sports or the arts like singing,” Pearson said. “The good news is that, in all but the most rare, extreme cases, this damage will reverse itself if the teen stops vaping.”

Ease of acquisition and hiding from parents:
Vapes are pretty easy to get for teens — nearly 60 percent of high school students in Nevada said it would be easy for them to get a vape if they wanted one in 2019.

Most vapes don’t look like what adults think of as drug paraphernalia. “There are a lot of ways that teens can hide these products in plain sight of their parents and teachers,” said Malcolm Ahlo, Tobacco Control Program Coordinator for the Southern Nevada Health District. “They look like pens, highlighters, phone chargers and even other electronic products.”

Vaping doesn’t smell like smoke, making it even more difficult to detect – vaping just gives off a light odor of whatever flavor is being vaped.

What can parents do?
Parents have the power to help their teens and young adults protect themselves.

“Our data show that if kids think their parents disapprove of e-cigarette use, they are much less likely to use e-cigarettes, and this is especially true for middle school aged adolescents ” Pearson said. “Parents need to strongly communicate to their kids that this is not acceptable, it is not just water vapor, and they are addictive.”

NTPC shares these tips for parents:
Like any other important conversation you have with your teen — do not panic. Look for ways to work you concern about vaping into everyday conversation instead of lecturing or giving them “the talk.”

Show you child that you’re listening and give them opportunity to talk openly.

Ask them about their mood and mental health in general. Vaping and symptoms of anxiety and depression often travel together. Kids might be vaping as a way to deal with these symptoms and would benefit from talking with a doctor.

Focus on the facts instead of scare tactics. Adolescents can smell an overstatement a mile away and that will hurt your credibility with them.

Additional tips and programs to help teens quit vaping can be found on letstalkvaping.com

Anti-Vaping Campaign
To better educate teens and their families about the dangers of vaping, NTPC introduced the Behind The Haze NV campaign in 2020 to deliver educational content that exposes the truth about vapes and discourages use among Nevada teens ages 13-18 years old. Let’s Talk Vaping is a complimentary campaign that was introduced in late 2020, and is designed to give adults the tools they need to fight this dangerous habit.

The campaign was developed with support for SB263 from state legislators Heidi Gansert, Marilyn Dondero Loop, David Parks and Julia Ratti. This funding allowed for collection of data from youth statewide, which has helped to inform the campaign, and also allows for broader education to unveil the unethical tactics of the vaping industry.

For more information on Nevada Tobacco Prevention Coalition, research and the dangers of vaping please visit www.tobaccofreenv.org.

About Nevada Tobacco Prevention Coalition
NTPC is a collaboration of organizations and individuals that work in public health, health care, local and national nonprofits, community-based organizations, insurance payors, professional and medical associations, higher education, and government. NTPC members work together and pool resources toward the goal of ultimately eliminating commercial tobacco use and secondhand smoke exposure as a public health issue.
NTPC’s mission is to improve the health of all Nevadans by reducing the burden of tobacco use and nicotine addiction. For a comprehensive list of members and for more information on NTPC, please visit www.tobaccofreenv.org or like us on Facebook.


Streamling the DA’s Office, Getting Vaccine Serum into arms and Insuring Continued Operations of the Childrens Museum

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Board of Supervisors meeting location….

City Supervisors today gave the go ahead for District Attorney Jason Woodbury to streamline and make much more efficient the city’s procedures in handling criminal cases.  Woodbury went through a very complicated assessment of his office, pointing out inefficiencies in the way data and criminal evidence is processed and the length of time it often takes to determine a suspect’s sentencing for a criminal act and conviction, or determining whether the suspect is innocent.  Woodbury says his office has a set of very logical procedures but their traditional ways of processing information and adjudication can be far better handled with more up to date computerized processes at handling evidence surrounding a case.

Woodbury went over the advantages of abandoning some of their computer programs and devoting more energy and funds to acquire newer computer resources and software for the DA’s office.  Woodbury said suspected criminal information can be handled more quickly from arrest, to incarceration, case study, information mitigation and discovery at a lightning pace.  Cases can be more efficiently processed and decided upon.  In short, justice moves at a faster and more accurate pace.  And probably at lower cost.

An impressed Board of Supervisors was quick to approve Woodbury’s request for the overhaul of his department’s evidentiary work flow.  Woodbury told the Board that the transition to the new system will take some time but in the end, the new system – which is nearly revolutionizing District Attorney’s offices all across the country – will finally arrive in Carson City.  Woodbury and the Board of Supervisors agreed that the slightly higher cost for the new system will be softened by the cost savings it will generate by hyper-streamlining the work flow.

The Supervisors also agreed to a Carson City Children’s Museum lease extension.  The lease came in at a whopping $1 a year.  Yup…one dollar….which of course helps the Children’s Museum devote more energy and more resources that are made possible with public and business donations going toward the goals of the museum.  A really good deal for further educating the children of Carson City.  

And finally the Supervisors were told by Carson City Health officials and Covid-19 vaccination folks that the distribution of vaccine has been going very well.  In many areas of the country the distribution has been up and down….sometimes nothing – but Nevada has been hangin’ in there.  The initial distribution set-up was highly irregular but Nevada health and other officials managed to smooth out the delivery.  But there have been complaints among entities representing senior citizens that the elderly has been short-changed lately prompting Governor Sisolak to pump up that group of people.  At the same time, complaints have arisen that teachers and kids need to get back to school so students will hopefully have instructors “live” in the classroom as opposed to just internet connections.

Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak grateful for vaccine deliveries – wants FEMA to keep up the pace…

Governor Steve Sisolak – wants more vaccines for Nevada.

A report from Governor Steve Sisolak indicates that although Nevada has been receiving a lot anti-Covide-19 shots, Nevada should get more vaccines for those who need them.

In an update provided from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), based on federal data Nevada has received over 324,000 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine and has administered 248,000 doses — or 76.7 percent of doses received in the State.

Nevada is currently leading all states and territories in FEMA Region 9 when it comes to percent of doses administered.

The Governor said, “I could not be more proud of Nevada’s immunization program for continuing to push forward and make sure that we are distributing doses of the COVID-19 vaccine as fast as we can. These numbers are a result of a statewide concentrated effort to use every resource at our disposal and to focus our collective efforts on this historic immunization effort, in addition to the additional federal assistance the Biden-Harris Administration has provided.

The Governor continued, “While we are still not getting the number of doses we’d like, the State and our local partners are efficiently administering the doses we currently receive. I will continue to fight for more doses for Nevada, and as more are delivered to the State, we will continue to increase our efforts.”

 

Four Nevada Counties Snub Governor Sisolak’s Orders on Emergency Directives

Corona Virus

Governor Steve Sisolak has put together a plan to bring all Nevada Counties into compliance when it comes to facemasks, public gatherings, distancing and handwashing.  But the counties of Lyon, White Pine, Eureka and Elko said, in so many words….”Heck no.  We’ve declared ourselves independent because we’re under an emergency.  Therefore Governor Sisolak has no jurisdiction over how we handle the Covid-19 inside our own county boundaries.”

The counties declared their independence from the Governor based on what they believed – that in emergencies, the Governor has no control over them.

It didn’t take long for Governor Sisolak and Attorney General Aaron Ford to make a stern announcement that the four counties have no power to reject a statewide command stemming from the Covid-19 pandemic emergency.  That’s a job for governors and attorneys general.

Later in the day it appeared that the four counties began to soften their claim that they had 100% power over themselves during an emergency.  But state officials spent a big part of their day warning Lyon County and the others that they were not going to win this one.

This is an ongoing issue.  It may not be quite over yet,

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