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WEATHER IN CARSON CITY


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Older kids helping younger kids to read….

Older kids are helping the younger ones to be better readers….

It takes a village of friends to enhance reading skills…

EVMS Students Read to Grade Schoolers Using Student-Center Approach

As part of the AVID 8 (Advancement Via Individual Determination), eight graders from Eagle Valley Middle School took time to read books to elementary students, kindergarten through second grade, at Fremont and Seeliger Elementary schools in Carson City.

AVID is a nonprofit program that changes lives by helping schools shift to a more equitable, student-centered approach. Training more than 80,000 educators annually, the program seeks to close the opportunity gap, so educators may prepare all students for college, careers and life after high school.

Schools who partner with AVID receive professional development, a suite of resources and ongoing support to ensure a lasting impact. AVID aligns with schools’ goals to accelerate and enhance the work that is already happening.

Packed Planning Commission meeting on Andersen Ranch housing project

The Carson City Planning Commission decided Tuesday evening that a proposed very high density 203 home subdivision should be allowed to be built on what’s left of the Andersen Ranch on the west side of Carson City.  The homes would be fairly small because the lot sizes are pretty small, for the most part.  There was some controversy over where the single story models should go and where the two story models should wind up.  Some of those in the jam-packed audience questioned two story models as blocking views of the mountains to the west.

Many in the audience were opposed to the development.

There was also a lot of complaining about the number of homes being squeezed onto a 45 acre footprint.  But it was revealed by planning staff that the city’s land use designation allowed the 200+ plus homes.  The developer also reminded the commission that they gave up some surface area to not crowd the neighbors that surround the project area – especially to the north and south of the property.  The developer also outlined city streets that would be allowed to pass through the new neighborhood – especially West Sunset to La Mirada to Long, which would likely reduce traffic loads on Mountain.  West Sunset will empty out onto Mountain.

Still, the neighbors complained about the sheer number of homes in such a small area as to likely clog up West Long, Mountain and Fleischmann Way, especially during commute-to-work times.

A highly dense housing development surrounded by larger lot, older/legacy homes.  Some are 19th and early 20th Century mansions.

Meanwhile the developers pointed out the amount of open space that buffers the homes from adjoining neighborhoods which, as was stated earlier, ensures the old neighbors don’t get the new neighbors smacked up against their fences.  The southern “green belt” along the south side of the development is expected to act as an escape valve to allow flood waters coming down out of the mountains to safely pass through the new development as it empties in to the city’s storm drains.

Packed Planning Commission meeting. Developers in front row.

The planning commission took note of the Superintendent of Schools outlining his concern about all the new homes with a lot of children likely to be part of the formula.  The superintendent says individual school boundaries will likely have to be redrawn along with expanding more than one school to handle all the new kids – which will involve no small amount of money.  However, the developers have said that the 200+ homes will not be built all at once – and likely will take a number of years to achieve build-out.  So the school district has at least “some” breathing room to plan and expand their schools accordingly.

Planning Commission voted 4-2 to recommend approval to the Board of Supervisors.

There was some “back-and-forth” between the developers and the planning commission about the streets within the new project.  The developers said they would, of course, put in the new streets but they expect the city to maintain them as it does throughout the rest of the city.  A couple of planning commissioners mentioned that they would oppose such an arrangement because, as it is, the city can’t keep up the maintenance of city streets they’re already responsible for.  Commissioners also said that a trail head immediately west of the project shouldn’t fall on the city’s dime – that’s up to the developers.  Disagreement there too. 

In the end, the planning commission approved the Andersen Ranch project on a 4 to 2 vote.  The project next visits the Carson City Board of Supervisors on January 16th.  We’ll see how the supervisors view the project.  The supervisors have the final say.  Even if the supervisors gives the project a “thumbs up” the developers say it won’t be fully built out for some time.

Body of older male found in the hills behind CTH

At approximately 1:48 pm Tuesday a hiker in the hills between Carson Tahoe Hospital and Lakeview Estates discovered the remains of a deceased older male.  The remains were largely buried in the snow.  Detectives have processed the scene and removed the body for transport to the Washoe County Medical Examiners Office for an autopsy, scheduled for Thursday.  Identification of the remains and cause of death will be determined by the Medical Examiner (ME).

There was a missing person report filed last week that might help the ME identify the body.

Somebody ran a red light at Lompa and Highway 50

Red car entered Highway 50 from Lompa.

Witnesses say a fairly high velocity T-Bone accident sent two women to the hospital with minor injuries around noon Tuesday. They said the red car was entering the intersection of Highway 50 at Lompa Lane from North Lompa and was T-Boned by a gray car headed east on 50. The two vehicles then slid slightly south and smashed up against a utility vehicle that had crossed the stop line from the south Lompa side.

The green vehicle was slightly damaged.  The dark & red car were heavily damaged.

Again, injuries were minor. It could have been a lot worse. Always remember, paying attention to your lane is never enough. You’ve got to be aware of what’s going on around you.

Outdoor hiking and biking is about to reach new heights this summer behind Prison Hill

Thanks to some development land sales of state properties in and around Las Vegas, the state was able to pass along some of the proceeds to help further develop outdoor recreation opportunities for rural communities around Nevada. In our case here in Carson City, the state gifted Carson City with around $3 Million to create fully functional hiking paths that don’t rely on walking partially on busy roadways.

From the map there will be a hiking path from the 5th Street Roundabout all the way southeast to the Silver Saddle Ranch. From there you can walk a pathway northward to Riverview Park and then cut over toward the west and continue the loop back to your car that you left in 5th Street parking area that will also be expanded and upgraded.

The city expects to construct the west side path from the 5th Street Roundabout to the Silver Saddle Ranch this spring and then construct the east side pathways north to Riverview Park with completion in late summer/early fall. Again you can just retrace your steps back to the south or take the shorter route across the north end of the area to return to your vehicle parked in the parking lot at the northwest corner of the open space area.

The paths will be built for hikers AND bicyclists so be heads-up when you’re out there enjoying Carson City’s great outdoors along the Carson River.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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