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CC Family learns not to leave food on the stove – cooked or otherwise…

Firefighters knocked the kitchen fire down really quick…

Carson City Firefighters (with their new looooong ladder truck) pulled up outside a house on Sandstone to see smoke coming out of it. Nobody was home but there was a dog in the house – that had something to do with it.

As it turned out, the family was away on an errand leaving their dog alone in the home.   The dog went into the kitchen where it smelled something good – fragrant dog treats in a box on top of the stove.

With nobody home their dog started jumping up, repeatedly trying to get at the dog treats.  But, in so doing, the dog’s paws accidentally hit a burner control knob and that activated a burner that the dog treats were sitting on.  The box burst into flame and smoke began filling the house.

The heat from the stove burner pretty much destroyed the sought-after treats….

A neighbor saw the smoke and called Carson City Firefighters who were on scene quickly.   They entered the home and doused the fire, saving the house.

Lesson Learned – Never leave anything on the stove burner(s) if you’re leaving your home, especially if you have a treat-seeking pooch.  By the way, the dog was not injured – but it was possibly admonished.

Covid-19 still pounding on Carson City

Quad-County COVID-19 Update: 2 Deaths, 277 New Cases, and 70 Recoveries

Carson City Health and Human Services (CCHHS) is reporting 2 additional deaths due to COVID-19 in the Quad-County Region. The individuals were:

  • A male Douglas County resident in his 70’s
  • A male Carson City resident in his 60’s

CCHHS is also reporting 277 new cases and 70 additional recoveries of COVID-19 in the Quad-County Region. This brings the total number of cases to 7,986, with 3,548 recoveries and 81 deaths; 4,357 cases remain active.

Carson City Health and Human Services is working to identify close risk contacts to prevent further spread of the disease.

County Total Cases Active Cases Recovered Deaths
Carson City 4,385 2,464 1,881 40
Douglas County 1,663 946 706 11
Lyon County 1,873 922 923 28
Storey County 65 25 38 2
TOTAL 7,986 4,357 3,548 81

Gender and age break down of the cases by county as well as the cases by zip code, found at https://gethealthycarsoncity.org/novel-coronavirus-2019/ will be updated as information becomes available. Statewide numbers can be found at the Nevada Health Response website (nvhealthresponse.nv.gov/).

Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing for Quad-County Residents

Testing is for Quad-County (Carson City, Douglas, Lyon, and Storey County) residents ONLY. All others will be turned away. Events may be canceled 48 hours in advance if inclement weather is expected. Testing is free of charge. Events are first come, first served, no appointments or reservations. View all upcoming events at https://gethealthycarsoncity.org/events/.

Date Time Location
12/18/2020 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. Carson City Corporate Yard

549 Airport Rd, Carson City

For those who are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 or have questions, call the Quad-County COVID-19 Hotline Monday through Friday, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. Spanish speakers are available. The phone number is (775) 434-1988.

Further instructions for CC families from Carson City School District

In-Person Learning to be offered to grades 3 to 6 beginning in January  

Carson City School District School Board of Trustees has established in-person, on-campus instruction for third to sixth graders, four days a week, Tuesdays through Fridays. The first official day will begin Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2021. The district announced a return to 4-days-per-week, in-person learning for Pre-K to second grade students Oct. 20.

For all students (at all grade levels) throughout the Carson City School District, Mondays will remain remote learning days. Students, both full-remote and in-seat, will check in with their homeroom teachers electronically and work independently throughout the school day. 

Students in grades seventh through twelfth will remain in their assigned groups and will continue to receive instruction via the hybrid-blended learning model. Any students and families who have enrolled in full-remote instruction may continue the remote learning if they choose. The wearing of face masks and maintaining social distancing between students is still required. 

As governmental directions and social conditions change, our educational operations will also reflect these changes. We will continue to use the guidance and best practices suggested by national and state leaders in an effort to keep our students and staff safe. 

At this point, it’s mostly about saving lives…

Nevada Department of Corrections takes additional steps to soften the blow of  COVID-19

CARSON CITY, NV — Disinfectant foggers, upgraded PPE and strategic cohorts are among the additional steps being taken to battle COVID-19 within the Nevada Department of Corrections.

“Every single day here is going to count,” said Dr. Michael Minev, Medical Director for the Nevada Department of Corrections. “We are taking measures to mitigate the spread.”

Foggin’ up the prison to minimize the threat of the Covid-19

The first hospital-grade disinfectant fogger has arrived at Northern Nevada Correctional Center in Carson City, where it is being used to sanitize common areas as well as individual cells.

Additional machines have been ordered and will be dispersed throughout the facilities.

The Department’s protocol on the use of personal protective equipment has also been updated to require all staff who are within six feet of inmates for more than 15 minutes to wear the N95 mask, which offer more protection against airborne particles than the cloth masks.

The Department is working with the state’s Division of Emergency Management to secure more than 400,000 N95 masks for all inmates and staff.

While NDOC has been separating COVID-19 positive and COVID-19 potentially exposed inmates by way of isolation and quarantine since the inception, “due to the rapid rise of COVID-19 infection within our facilities, we must, to the extent possible taking into account safety and security issues relating to classification levels of inmates and staffing issues, separate our inmates at all facilities into three completely distinct cohorts,” Dr. Minev directed.  

Correctional institutions throughout the state are also changing the way inmates and staff are grouped together.

“Due to the rapid rise of COVID-19 infection within our facilities, we must separate our inmates at all facilities into three completely separated cohorts,” Dr. Minev directed.

The cohorts include:

  • Isolation cohort comprised of only offenders who have tested positive for COVID-19
  • Quarantine cohort comprised of only offenders who have been exposed to COVID-19, are exhibiting symptoms consistent with COVID-19 (and awaiting COVID-19 test results) or are awaiting COVID-19 testing results
  • Non-exposed cohort comprised of only offenders who are asymptomatic and have not been exposed to COVID-19

Additionally, the Department is pairing staff that has recovered from the virus with inmates who have not yet contracted the virus or who are among those most high-risk.

“We are trying to strategically place custody and medical staff in such a way as to reduce the spread,” Minev said. “We are relying on those who have cleared infection to prevent the spread to our vulnerable population.”

Most recent numbers show the Nevada Department of Corrections has 2,442 offenders who have tested positive with COVID-19 and 561 staff. That is about 21 percent of the total population of 11,540 across all facilities.

Taking into account recoveries, those currently positive are 1,624 inmates and 205 staff.

Eight offenders and two employees have died.

State health officials report 196,379 cumulative cases in Nevada.

“We have had a rapid rise in community infections, which has affected our custody and other staff,” Minev said. “That has led to the rise in infections in the inmate population.”

Nevada borrowing money from our Uncle Sam to hold the state together…

The Nevada Department of Employment,Training and Rehabilitation announced Thursday it has started borrowing money from the federal government to help ensure Nevada residents who are eligible for regular unemployment benefits continue to receive those payments without interruption during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Due to the ongoing pandemic resulting in historic unemployment claims, the State exhausted its trust fund and began borrowing funds earlier this week.

Borrowing funds from the federal government in this manner is typical in times of economic recessions. Nevada now joins 22 other states in borrowing funds under Title XII of the Social Security Act.

DETR will continue to borrow funds as necessary similar to what was done in the last recession, to ensure eligible citizens receive their benefits without interruption.

250+ Apartments going up at Little and Stewart

Site of a new apartment high rise to be constructed at Stewart and Little

 

The Carson City Planning Commission this week approved construction of a 5-story apartment complex at Stewart and Little Lane. Approving the project will help ease the city’s shortage of affordable dwellings. Those who would like to live and work in the downtown area can walk to work rather than drive, depending on how much exercise is desired.

Among the apartments are 21 studio apartments,138 one bedrooms, 94 two bedrooms and a mini park with an array of visual amenities to dress up the place.

Stewart Street Apartments
Over 500 living units
Approved by planning commission

Construction is a ways out.  Designers of the project are still putting the finishing touches on the project.  But it sure looks impressive…

Vaccine update…Thursday

State’s first COVID-19 vaccines given to health care workers

More than 35,000 doses expected in Oregon before week’s end

COVID-19 immunizations with the new Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine began today in Oregon, kicking off a statewide effort that could see thousands of health care workers getting first doses by week’s end.

The state is expected to receive 35,100 doses this week, according to the Oregon Health Authority Immunization Program, citing federal allocation estimates. The first shipments from that batch arrived Monday and Tuesday, when four health systems — Legacy Health, Oregon Health & Science University and Kaiser Permanente and Saint Alphonsus — received a total of 4,875 doses.

Hospital staff at OHSU, Saint Alphonsus Medical Center in Ontario, and at Legacy Health’s Holladay Park and Meridian Park sites started getting vaccinated today; Kaiser expects to begin its vaccinations on Friday.

Of this week’s federal vaccine allotment, 10,725 doses are being sent to pharmacies serving skilled nursing facilities as part of a federal partnership with CVS, Walgreens and Consonus Healthcare to offer on-site, no-cost COVID-19 vaccines to staff and residents of more than 680 long term care facilities in Oregon. Their vaccinations are set to begin sometime next week, and will begin with skilled nursing facilities, but eventually will be used to vaccinate in a variety of congregate care settings, including a handful of facilities caring for residents with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

In all, between 300,000 and 400,000 health care workers, and long-term care facility staff and residents in Oregon are slated for vaccination against COVID-19 during the first phase of the state’s vaccination distribution effort.

The remaining 19,500 doses from this week’s batch will be distributed to health facilities around the state over the next several days.

More Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine deliveries are scheduled the weeks of Dec. 20 and Dec. 27, when allocations of 25,350 and 48,750, respectively, are expected to arrive in Oregon.

The allocation of 25,350 doses of Pfizer-BioNTech now scheduled to arrive in Oregon the week of Dec. 20 is a reduction from the original amount of 40,950 Oregon was previously scheduled to have allocated during that week. Federal officials notified the state about the change today.

A COVID-19 vaccine made by Moderna Inc., which is expected to receive FDA emergency use authorization within days, also are scheduled for delivery in the state before the end of the month — 71,900 doses the week of Dec. 20 and 31,700 doses the week of Dec. 27. These allocation numbers are provided to states by the CDC for planning purposes, but are subject to change.

If estimated allocations for Oregon are received, state health officials expect health systems will have a sufficient amount of vaccine to provide first doses to more than 100,000 health care workers and long term care facility residents by the end of the month.

Speaking during a news conference with Gov. Kate Brown and representatives from the health facilities that received vaccine deliveries this week, OHA Director Patrick Allen said: “On Feb. 28, 2020 — 292 days ago — the world changed for all of us. That was the day the first COVID-19 case was diagnosed in Oregon,” Allen said. “Today the world has changed again. Today we’ve seen the first COVID-19 vaccinations in Oregon. I want every Oregonian to know: COVID-19 vaccination is the safest, most effective and most reliable way to keep yourself, your family and your community healthy and safe from COVID-19.”

Director Allen also clarified his comments at the news conference: “Earlier today, I was imprecise in describing the number of doses currently on the ground in Oregon. I’m also afraid my comments about the speed at which health care workers would receive second doses was confusing. I take responsibility for my inaccuracy. As we move forward, it’s vital that the Oregon Health Authority is fully transparent, accurate, reliable and consistent in all aspects of our vaccination program, especially our data. I pledge that I will do better.”

Carson City Fire Department extends its reach in putting out fires and rescuing people

CC’s New ladder truck to give firefighters all the angles in knocking down fires…

Carson City Fire Department put into service Ladder 50 Wednesday morning with the traditional push-in ceremony at Station 52. Ladder 50 is a tiller driven truck with an aerial ladder that extends to 107 feet. For over 10 years the department struggled with multistory structure fires without the use of a ladder truck, a very critical element of response, a need that until today would only be fulfilled with mutual aid assistance from neighboring counties.

“Today is a great day for the Carson City Fire Department as we place Ladder 50 into service. Ladder 50 greatly enhances our response capabilities and improves our service levels to the Capital City of Nevada,” said Carson City Fire Chief Sean Slamon. “I want to thank the Board of Supervisors and City Manager Paulson for supporting the purchase of Carson City’s only Ladder Truck. I also want to thank our department’s Apparatus Committee for designing the specifications for the truck, the committee designed a very functional and capable ladder truck that will serve the city with pride over the next twenty years.”

The committee recommended the purchase of a Tractor Drawn Aerial Truck (TDA), with specifications including a 70-gallon compressed air foam system capable of extinguishing vehicle fires, dumpster/trash fires, and various other fire responses. The TDA has a better turning radius and maneuverability than other ladder trucks, a highly appropriate feature for Carson City.

In Carson City there are more than 40 commercial buildings with three or more stories, numerous apartments and residences, and current developments which include multistory structures expanding the response-type demands. The ladder truck has a multitude of uses, from being able to put out a large volume of water above the fire to setting up ropes for a technical rescue. The body of Ladder 50 is made from aluminum and stainless steel, and is decked with the Carson City Fire Department’s colors, “Battle Born” blue and fiery yellow, while the truck expands on fire crew capabilities it also represents the department’s progress and the goal of fulfilling the needs of a growing community.

YouTube channel featuring the push-in ceremony for the new ladder truck! https://youtu.be/cMr33ZfTnK4

‘Tis the Season to Behave Ourselves – Celebrate Safely – Wear Safety Masks, Wash Your Hands and Keep Your Distance

Avoid losing your life just because you’ve had more than a wee too much happy juice…

Impaired Drivers

Impaired Drivers cause fatal traffic crashes

The Carson City Sheriff’s Office is joining forces with other Nevada Law Enforcement Agencies during this holiday season to enforce impaired driving laws and keep impaired drivers off of Nevada roadways. Officers will be out in force from December 21st through January 4th.

Statistics show that during the holidays we always see an increase in impaired driving violations. If you’re attending a party or getting together with family or friends to celebrate the holidays please remember to celebrate responsibly. It doesn’t take much to be an impaired driver. Please keep an eye out for others, enjoy the holidays and encourage safe, responsible celebrations and cheer.

Federal data shows nationwide:

These deaths are 100% preventable!! It’s a choice to drive impaired!! It’s a bad choice!!

The Carson City Sheriff’s Office remains dedicated to bringing the number of fatalities on our roadways to zero through increasing public awareness about the dangers of driving under the influence of drugs and alcohol. More information about safe driving and the state’s Zero Fatalities goal is available online at www.ZeroFatalitiesNV.com.

The Nevada Department of Public Safety’s- Office of Traffic Safety (OTS) provides funding for law enforcement agencies to participate in Joining Forces to reduce traffic deaths and injuries on Nevada roadways. Visit www.zerofatalitiesnv.com for more information.

  • Nationally, over the past 5 years, an average of 300 people died in impaired driving crashes the week between Christmas and New Year.
  • Over a quarter (25%) of all traffic-related deaths are the direct results of alcohol impairment.
  • Nationwide every day around 800 people are injured in a drunken driving crash and 30 people die.

Local data on Covid-19

Quad-County COVID-19 Update: 168 New Cases and 39 Recoveries  

(Carson City, NV)- Carson City Health and Human Services (CCHHS) is reporting 168 new cases and 39 additional recoveries of COVID-19 in the Quad-County Region. This brings the total number of cases to 7,709, with 3,478 recoveries and 79 deaths; 4,152 cases remain active.

Carson City Health and Human Services is working to identify close risk contacts to prevent further spread of the disease.

County Total Cases Active Cases Recovered Deaths
Carson City 4,150 2,265 1,846 39
Douglas County 1,636 939 687 10
Lyon County 1,858 921 909 28
Storey County 65 27 36 2
TOTAL 7,709 4,152 3,478 79

Gender and age break down of the cases by county as well as the cases by zip code, found at https://gethealthycarsoncity.org/novel-coronavirus-2019/ will be updated as information becomes available. Statewide numbers can be found at the Nevada Health Response website (nvhealthresponse.nv.gov/).

Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing for Quad-County Residents

Testing is for Quad-County (Carson City, Douglas, Lyon, and Storey County) residents ONLY. All others will be turned away. Events may be canceled 48 hours in advance if inclement weather is expected. Testing is free of charge. Events are first come, first served, no appointments or reservations. View all upcoming events at https://gethealthycarsoncity.org/events/.

Date Time Location
12/18/2020 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. Carson City Corporate Yard

549 Airport Rd, Carson City

For those who are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 or have questions, call the Quad-County COVID-19 Hotline Monday through Friday, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. Spanish speakers are available. The phone number is (775) 434-1988.

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