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WEATHER IN CARSON CITY


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Adele’s is no more…just a pile of soon-to-be-forgotten historic rubble

Adele’s Restaurant:  Clawed back down to the ground by an instrument of “progress.”

Carson City’s fine dining ‘center of gravity’ is no more.  Heavy equipment took down Adele’s at Carson and John in pretty short order, Wednesday.

Remember Adele’s haunting dark red outer skin…

Adele’s owners Charlie and Karen Abowd had to close down the venerable dining establishment after a fire last year caused smoke damage throughout the restaurant. After unsuccessfully trying to get their insurance company to agree to a settlement on the seriously wounded dining haven, a group of Adele’s community supporters tried to raise enough money to move the restaurant to a new location.  But after a valiant effort to raise the money they still came up short.  The group said they had no choice but to close it down.  Then watch it fall down.

The last vestiges of Adele’s will be gone by the weekend

The contractor hired to demolish “Adele’s” has completed the demolition.  The debris will likely be cleaned up by the weekend.  In its place will be a common inheritor of previous notable structures.  But it will not be adorned with french architecture,  fine dining or fabulous fine-wine-induced conversations.  It will all be replaced with the sounds of traffic, honking horns and the wide-open spaces of yet another run-of-the-mill newly paved parking lot – next to a gas station.

Remote Teaching Process in Carson City to Continue Through June 3

In response to Nevada Gov. Sisolak’s announcement to extend the “Distance Learning” directive through the remainder of the school year, the Carson City School District will fall in compliance and continue with Remote Learning for teachers and students through June 3rd.

Superintendent Richard Stokes shared the following to school board trustees, educators and employees in a districtwide message via email:

“At a press conference yesterday, Governor Sisolak made an official declaration that schools in Nevada would not return to “in person” learning for the remainder of the current school year. This means that at this time, schools will not resume normal “on-campus” operations this year. According to our District’s academic calendar, the last day of this school year is June 3, 2020.

As a result of the Governor’s decision, we will continue to provide remote learning services to our students and families until the final day of school. For the elementary grades, the packets that were prepared and distributed yesterday and today are intended to provide grade-level instructional materials through the end of the school year. Secondary materials will continue to be developed and delivered using electronic means by each teacher. The same conditions already established of teachers making contact with students are still in effect. While this system of instruction delivery is unique to the pandemic, our intent is to provide new and challenging lessons and learning opportunities for our students. Since we now know that we will be holding school remotely for the remainder of the school year, teachers will plan and deliver work and expectations accordingly. As in the past, please be aware that operations may change according to new information or conditions.

I am so appreciative of the concern and work that our teachers and everyone has contributed during this unusual school year. Parents, students, and community members alike have expressed their appreciation for our commitment, care, and professionalism as we continue to provide educational services. Thanks to our teachers and staff for their dedication, integrity, and desires to help our students and families during this extraordinary time.

As we turn our eyes to the immediate future, please consider that we will be facing an “end of a school year” that will be very different from any we have experienced previously. While getting ready to bring this school year to a close, we are still being asked to maintain appropriate social distancing and not to meet in groups of more than 10 people. As such, we should expect significant limitations on any typical end of year events. Knowing that students will not be returning to our campuses, we will be providing additional guidance in closing out the school year and preparing for the next one.

I wish you all good health and happiness as we continue to contribute to the well-being of our district, community, state, and nation.”

Please continue checking the Carson City School District website carsoncityschools.com and our social media sites Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for further updates.

Quick, full-on response saves large home on the west side of Carson City

CCFD crews pulled up to large home in the 34-hundred block of Harvard Drive on a report of an upper bedroom on fire.

Firefighters mounted a very quick attack on the blaze, upstairs to the west.

Firefighters found a bed on fire, the flames spreading to the walls and floor. The fire was put out very quickly. 

Firefighters say smoke and fire damage will likely mean the family will have to find temporary quarters until the fire damage can be cleaned up and the bedroom repaired. The fire was believed started from a lit candle near or on a bed. With public schools closed and students learning school lessons at home via the internet, parents are well advised to keep a close eye on their children.

Governor Sisolak offers thoughts about a return to normalcy – in steps

Governor Steve Sisolak
Still In the thick of it…

Governor Steve Sisolak and his staff have begun what they hope will be an overall return to social and economic normalcy throughout the Silver State.  But Governor Sisolak is also making no promises as to progress toward those ends because there are so many unknowns – like is the latest decline in the rates of infections and recovery be trusted to endure – or is it just a blip on the screen?  Will the state be given enough Covid-19 testing kits and will a vaccine emerge quickly?

Governor Sisolak said he realizes Nevadans are more than anxious to go back to their work and their homes knowing that things will work out eventually.  They just hope it’s sooner than later.

Governor Sisolak says he’s hoping to see a sustained recovery around the state with declines in hospital stays.  And, of course, fewer deaths from the virus.  Governor Sisolak wants to see at least a consistent drop in viral cases over the next two weeks along with continuing social distancing at work and while shopping.  And if everything goes well he will also call for re-opening film and live theater productions, sporting events, church services and other group activities but only with a consistent reduction in Covid-19 cases. But he also added that bars and taverns will remain closed and there will be no visits, family or otherwise, to senior living facilities or hospitals.  The Governor said the proof will be in whether the Covid-19 infection rate stays on a downward slope.  He said we all need to be ready for unanticipated spikes in new cases and be ready to smother them when they pop up. He added, “It’s all data driven.” He went on to admit that these are tough times – but we must try to not be overwhelmed by it.

The Nevada Hospital Association has recorded a steady decline in viral cases for the past two weeks as well as the use of ventilators and intensive care units, sometimes called ICU’s.  Governor Sisolak says only a dramatic increase in virus testing will give Nevada a better sense of what’s really happening on the streets of the Silver State along with contact tracking so others who show no symptoms, though exposed, can be interviewed.

Depending on how all this plays out Governor Sisolak there could be consideration to re-opening some of the state’s casinos and other attractions.  But not schools.  Schools are closed until next fall.  Meanwhile students will finish the current year with distance learning from home or other facilities which will require nothing short of spectacular outreach from administrators, teachers and staff.

Governor Sisolak was asked whether he thinks that regular school operations could start up again in the fall, he said it’s too early to guess – but he hopes it can happen.

On another matter – unemployment checks not arriving on time – Governor Sisolak said there are problems with paycheck distribution. But that’s to be expected because of a surge claims that came in all at once back in March.  Governor Sisolak promised out-of-work Nevadans that “You will be paid – and soon!”  He also said Nevada is considering joining California, Oregon and Washington State in pooling their resources to speed up the west coast’s recovery from the Corona Virus invasion.

And so it goes from this point in time.  Time will tell what’ll happen next.  Let’s all hope for the best. 

Nevada public schools remain shut down – distance learning until semester ends

Governor Steve Sisolak
In the thick of it…

Governor Steve Sisolak announced today that Nevada school buildings will remain closed through the end of the 2019-20 school year. Districts and charter schools with approved Emergency Programs of Distance Education are expected to continue to offer learning opportunities to all students through the previously scheduled end of the school year as determined by local calendars.

“Due to current safety concerns and the need for ongoing social distancing, I have made the difficult decision to keep school buildings closed for the duration of the Spring,” Governor Sisolak said. “This is in the best interest of our students, educators, staff, and communities. I want to thank our district and school employees, students, and families, for your efforts to continue teaching and learning under difficult circumstances.”

The Nevada Department of Education (NDE) has been in constant contact with district and school leaders, educational partners, and stakeholders regarding the implementation of distance education and to provide necessary support to students and educators during the school building closures. NDE worked with Governor Sisolak and the U.S. Department of Education to provide flexibility to districts and schools, including through waivers of federal and State assessment requirements and guidance to ensure that high school seniors can graduate on-time.

“Though students will not be returning to school campuses, school is not over for the year,” said Superintendent of Public Instruction Jhone Ebert. “This announcement encourages us to double down on our efforts to strengthen our delivery of distance education and promote equitable access to resources for all learners.”

“Nevada has a long-standing tradition of local control and, as such, district and school leaders are empowered to make decisions regarding the content of distance education, curriculum, and grades,” Ebert said. “This applies to decisions regarding how best to handle graduation and other end-of-year milestones within the rules established by the Governor’s Emergency Directives and the guidance from public health officials.”

“We face a challenge to public health and safety unlike any in recent history. Reaching into every corner of our State and affecting every aspect of our lives, it is testing us in ways we may not fully grasp for months and years to come,” Ebert continued. “The way forward may be clouded with uncertainty, but this much is clear: Rising to the occasion takes a whole-society effort. At moments like this, it is comforting to recognize we have within us the wherewithal to meet this challenge. I am proud of the innovative work going on across the State and I look forward to continuing to collaborate with administrators, educators, staff, and families to develop thoughtful processes and plans so we can make a smooth transition back to classrooms when the time comes.”

Students and families can expect communication from district and school leaders regarding plans for the remainder of the school year, such as graduation. Parents and families should contact their child’s school if they have questions or concerns related to school building closures and/or distance education. Local leaders are best positioned to provide up-to-date and accurate information and to address each child’s unique needs.

 

 

Pedestrian in a wheel chair bumped by a driver at Lowe’s

2:25pm An elderly man in a wheel chair in the Lowe’s parking lot was accidentally bumped by a car which knocked him out of his wheel chair. Reports say the man was shook up but he’s not seriously injured – scrapes…that’s about it.

2:36pm  Paramedics on scene confirm the man is not injured…some minor scapes.  He’s not being transported to the hospital.

Carson City Pass/Fail grading benefits students without losing a year of work

 

CARSON CITY — The Carson City School District will transition all secondary students to a Pass/Fail grading system for the second (Spring) semester of the 2019-2020 school year. The decision comes as principals, district-level administrators and members of the teachers’ union have discussed the extension of school closures following spring break.

“In our discussions to address the needs of our families and students at the close of this extraordinary school year, we have used as a guiding principle the idea to ‘do no harm’ to students,” said Richard Stokes, superintendent for the Carson City School District. “This statement will mean different things to different students given the many circumstances of individual families. As such, within the Pass/Fail grading system at the secondary level, we have implemented a process where a student or his/her family may appeal or petition the school principal to post the student’s letter grades in lieu of the Pass/Fail grade to the final transcript.”

Stokes said “Moving to Pass/Fail grading will benefit the staff and students without negative consequences for students with collegiate aspirations.   Universities across the country have made it clear that students will not be penalized for missing traditional standardized tests or for posting credit or no credit transcripts for this semester.”

“Grading policies must take the needs of all students into account, including those of English Learners, homeless and foster youth and those with differing access to digital learning and other tools or materials,” said Tasha Fuson, associate superintendent of Educational Services for the Carson City School District. “Fortunately, there are many different ways students can demonstrate understanding of standards. Teachers can give students a range of options in how they demonstrate their understanding of essential standards, allowing them to utilize strategies, technologies or platforms with which they are already familiar and that fit their differing context and needs.

For students with disabilities, any changes to learning strategies or grading policies should, as appropriate, be done in conjunction with the student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) to ensure that the changes respond to their learning needs.

Additionally, individual schools will need to establish policies for how students can make up late or missing work due to illness. Schools and teachers should reevaluate existing policy and make necessary changes based on the unique demands of distance learning, taking into account the need to be flexible given the public health crisis.

Middle school students who do not have the credits needed for promotion will be promoted to ninth grade at Pioneer High School (PHS) for the 2020-2021 school year. PHS will create intervention plans to assist these students in their transition to high school.

Latest Corona Virus Update in the Quad Counties

Corona Virus
Awaiting “The Peak”

Quad-County COVID-19 Update: Three Recoveries, No New Cases 

(Carson City, NV)- Quad-County Emergency Operations Center (Quad EOC) is reporting three additional recoveries and no new positive cases of COVID-19 in the Quad-County region. The total number of cases remains at 61, with 18 recoveries, 43 cases remain active.

County Total Cases Active Cases Recovered Deaths
Carson City 28 19 9 0
Douglas County 15 10 5 0
Lyon County 18 14 4 0
Storey County 0 0 0 0
TOTAL 61 43 18 0

There are four Quad-County residents currently hospitalized due to COVID-19.

Statewide numbers can be found at the Nevada Health Response website nvhealthresponse.nv.gov/.

As of April 19th approximately 1,124 COVID-19 tests were performed by all providers in the Quad-County region. COVID-19 collection and testing supplies are now meeting the demands of those needing testing in the Quad-Counties. Carson City Health and Human Services continues to follow the CDC priorities for testing, which are the same testing priorities utilized by all healthcare testing entities within the Quad-County region.

We are seeing COVID-19 spread through our communities. Community spread means spread of an illness for which the source of infection is unknown. Help flatten the curve; keep the number of cases low by staying home and practicing social distancing.

The Quad-County COVID-19 Hotline is staffed 7 days a week 8 am to 5 pm. Spanish speakers are available. The phone number is (775) 283-4789.

Stay informed. The COVID-19 situation is changing frequently. For updates and more information on COVID-19 visit https://gethealthycarsoncity.org/novel-coronavirus-2019/.

Fire at Flat Earth Pizza

1:50 pm  Fire at Flat Earth Pizza at 2010 E. William.  Fire in a pizza oven.  

1:53pm  Fire has been extinguished as best as employees can determine.  Fire Department checking for any fire extension in the roof area.

Pass/Fair grading for the end of the current semester in Carson City

The Carson City School District will move all secondary students to a Pass/Fail grading system for the second semester of the 2019-2020 school year. 

“In our discussions to address the needs of our families and students at the close of this extraordinary school year, we have used as a guiding principle the idea to ‘do no harm’ to students,” said Richard Stokes, superintendent for the Carson City School District. “This statement will mean different things to different students given the many circumstances of individual families. As such, within the Pass/Fail grading system at the secondary level, we have implemented a process where a student or his/her family may appeal or petition the school principal to post the student’s letter grades in lieu of the Pass/Fail grade to the final transcript.”

Moving to Pass/Fail grading will benefit the staff and students without negative consequences for students with collegiate aspirations, he continued. Universities across the country have made it clear that students will not be penalized for missing traditional standardized tests or for posting credit or no credit transcripts for this semester.

The Carson City School District has created this one-semester change in practice to post spring semester credits without positively or negatively impacting grade point averages. The district further explained colleges lean heavily on an official document called the “School Profile,” which explains circumstances to colleges, including graduation requirements, grade point average calculations, honors/AP courses, average SAT/ACT scores and other elements that make schools unique.

In this case, the shift to Pass/Fail grading in the face of a national pandemic will be described within both of the district’s high schools’ “School Profiles.” The move is temporary and will be discontinued when students and staff return to school in the fall.

“Grading policies must take the needs of all students into account, including those of English Learners, homeless and foster youth and those with differing access to digital learning and other tools or materials,” said Tasha Fuson, associate superintendent of Educational Services for the Carson City School District. “Fortunately, there are many different ways students can demonstrate understanding of standards. Teachers can give students a range of options in how they demonstrate their understanding of essential standards, allowing them to utilize strategies, technologies or platforms with which they are already familiar and that fit their differing context and needs.”

Teachers may also need to consider their overall learning goals; alternative means of administering tests, projects and other assessments; adaptations to assignments; revised weighting in individual teacher gradebooks and prioritizing the assessment of student mastery of essential standards, she continued.

For students with disabilities, any changes to learning strategies or grading policies should, as appropriate, be done in conjunction with the student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) to ensure that the changes respond to their learning needs.

Additionally, individual schools will need to establish policies for how students can make up late or missing work due to illness. Schools and teachers should reevaluate existing policy and make necessary changes based on the unique demands of distance learning, taking into account the need to be flexible given the public health crisis.

Assigning a grade in a distance learning context might require teachers to reconsider the kinds of materials they provide to and accept from students, Fuson said. Online resources, mobile applications and web platforms can help teachers provide flexible means of furthering instruction. When students are working at home from other materials, these can be shown or displayed by photographs attached to text messages where computers are not used or accessible.

Dual enrollment policies, including grading, will be determined based on the agreement between Western Nevada College (WNC) and the Carson City School District. Currently, Math 095/096 and English 095/098 teachers will post Pass/Fail grades. All 100 level or higher courses will follow WNC specific guidelines for grading.

Middle school students who do not have the credits needed for promotion will be promoted to ninth grade at Pioneer High School (PHS) for the 2020-2021 school year. PHS will create intervention plans to assist these students in their transition to high school.

Elementary School packets have been created for Kindergarten through fifth grade. The packets will contain ELA, Math, Computer, Music and PE assignments from April 20 through June 3 in anticipation of a potential extension of remote learning beyond May 1, 2020. Elementary school sites will arrange for parents and families for the packet pickup Tuesday, April 21, and/or Wednesday, April 22. Packets will also be available online on the district website or at each individual elementary school website where previous Student Assignments were available.

Elementary schools will not prepare fourth quarter report cards if students do not return for in-seat assessment, as teachers will not have enough evidence of student learning to make an appropriate evaluation of student progress.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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