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A Message from Univ. of CA Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center

Climate change is making wildfires more frequent, larger, and increasingly intense. It is also changing where they occur.

A new study shows that wildfires in the western United States have been spreading to higher elevations due to warmer and drier conditions. Between 1984 and 2017, wildfires in the West were found to be moving to higher elevations at a rate of 25 feet per year.

Fires are burning higher on mountainsides because areas that used to be too wet are now drier due to warmer temperatures and earlier snowmelt. The study also showed that drier air—which makes vegetation dry out and burn more easily—is moving upward at a rate of about 29 feet each year. This makes an additional 31,500 square miles (20,000,000 acres) of the mountainous West more vulnerable to fires.

The map (second photo above) shows where fires have moved upslope since 1984. Shades of yellow, orange, and red show the intensity of the elevation gain by mountain range. Some of the highest changes are here in the Sierra Nevada.

There are important impacts of high-elevation fires. Fires change how snow accumulates and melts, altering the meltwater availability downstream and in reservoirs. That impacts over 60 million people in the western U.S. who rely on these water sources. Fire debris, ash, and chemical retardants can also pollute the water. Much of the plant life at high altitudes is not fire-adapted and may grow back differently. Streams near high-elevation fires can also become much warmer, threatening native animals and plants that depend on cooler water and air.

Assessing the impacts of the 2021 fires on Lake Tahoe commenced within days of the fires starting. TERC, as part of the Tahoe Science Advisory Council, is working with research partners to assess the water quality as well as the biological and chemical changes to the lake from the current smoke and ash fallout. In the coming weeks, plans for monitoring winter runoff from the burned sections of the basin will be finalized, along with the plans for assessing the impacts to the forest, meadows, and the ecosystem they support. As a result of this rapid mobilization, from the ashes of a disaster, new information on the impacts of wildfire will emerge.

Our sincerest thanks go to the agencies and organizations who responded so quickly to guarantee of funding necessary for this intensive scientific effort.

And a huge thank you to the entire firefighting and first responder communities whose skill, bravery and extraordinary efforts prevented the impacts of the fires from becoming an even greater tragedy.

Mile High Jazz Band presents…..

Mile High Jazz Band Presents “September Songs,” An Outdoor Dinner Show

Live Big-band Jazz with Vocalist Jakki Ford

Tuesday, September 14, 6:30 p.m., at Living the Good Life

Mile High Jazz Band will perform “September Songs,” on Tuesday, September 14, 2021, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.  It’s an outdoor dinner show at Living the Good Life Bistro, 1480 N. Carson Street in Carson City.  The music is free, donations welcome; food and drink can be ordered from the menu. For reservations, text 775-720-5834 before 5:00 p.m. or call 775-841-4663 after 5:00 p.m.

The September 14 event, the fifth of a series of monthly dinner shows Mile High Jazz Band has scheduled at Living the Good Life, includes favorite big-band jazz tunes and features the vocal stylings of Jakki Ford.  Pianist and band leader David Bugli said, “Our monthly shows draw a large audience, and every performance is different.”  As a tribute to fire evacuees and first responders, the band will play “Moment of Sorrow,” with trumpet solo by Cassidy Robinson and trombone solo by Phil Jerome. Jakki Ford will sing “There’ll be Some Changes Made,” “Just Friends,” and more favorite tunes.

Mile High Jazz Band is supported in part by a grant from the Nevada Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts.  The Governor’s Office of Economic Development provided additional support through its Nevada Pandemic Emergency Technical Support (PETS) Grant for 2021.  For information about the band and activities, see milehighjazz.com.

National Silent Movie Day at The Bijou Theatre in Lincoln City

Bijou Theater
Lincoln City

September 29th is the first NATIONAL SILENT MOVIE DAY! The Bijou Theatre of Lincoln City is jumping in and celebrating by presenting the 1923 classic THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME staring Charles Laughton. 
  
Wednesday morning at 11:00am Mack Pimentel, of Pacific City, will be providing the musical (and other) soundtrack on the Bijou’s Might Allen Organ.  Mack has played-in the crowds at the Bijou’s Monday and occasional Friday 2:00 shows for the last 15 years.  $2 minimum donation goes to the regeneration and enhancement of the Allen Organ.  
This is reminiscent of when the Bijou did the WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON THEATRE ORGAN CLUB in the late 1990’s,  which was a monthly silent movie with organ accompaniment and an occasional guest player. 

Carson City 2021 Job Fair

CC Community Center

2021 Job Fair

(Carson City, NV) – Carson City Health and Human Services along with Carson City Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring an upcoming job fair. The event is scheduled for Friday, September 10th from 12:00 P.M. to 3:00 P.M. for the public. Veterans and disabled will have early access and may enter at 11:30 A.M. The job fair will be held in the large gym at the Carson City Community Center on 851 East William Street, Carson City, Nevada.

Over 50 employers from the following will be in attendance: Manufacturing, Retail, Gaming, Staffing Agencies, Utility Companies, Home Health, Security and more.

Job Seekers should bring an updated resume, dress to impress, and be prepared to fill out applications. Help with interview preparation and resume editing is available through Carson City Health and Human Services. Additional help with resumes and assistance finding free interview clothes is available through Northern Nevada Dream Hire. The program incorporates free work clothing and shoes and any necessary Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). For further information, please contact 775- 443-4090 x 2 or visit the website at www.nndreamcenter.org.

For additional information about the job fair or for interview preparation and resume editing, call 775-283-7579. Additional information about the event is also available at www.gethealthycarsoncity.org and www.facebook.com/CCHHS.

Gunfire near Starbucks on South Carson…possibly also at Rhodes and Curry

12:55pm  Reports of a gunshot or gunshots outside the the Starbucks on south Carson Street.  Witness said the shooter was driving a blue GMC pickup.

1:03pm  Arriving law enforcement are checking out the area.  There was also a report that the shots were coming from Curry Street to the west.  But there is also street upgrades going on on Curry which is making some construction noise.

1:05pm Report of possible gunshot(s) coming from Rhodes and Curry.

Nevada’s Attorney General rises to protect womens’ right to an abortion

AG Aaron Ford
NV Attorney General

Attorney General Ford Joins a Coalition of 21 Attorneys General in Fighting to Protect Women’s Access to Abortion Services 

Carson City, NV – Today, Nevada Attorney General Aaron D. Ford joined a coalition of 21 attorneys general in filing an amicus brief in Planned Parenthood South Atlantic v. Wilson arguing that South Carolina’s pre-viability abortion restrictions harm women’s health care as a whole and a lower court’s ruling blocking the law should be upheld. Additionally, the coalition also argues that the collective impact of numerous states across the country enacting restrictive abortion laws, or eliminating access to abortions, harms health care nationwide.

“Like Texas, South Carolina has directly attacked the constitutional reproductive rights of its residents, who must be allowed to access safe and legal abortions,” said AG Ford. “Women must be allowed to make their own decisions when it comes to their health care and bodily autonomy. Our office will not sit on the sidelines and watch as these shameful attacks on necessary health care continue.” 

In February 2021, South Carolina passed the South Carolina Fetal Heartbeat and Protection from Abortion Act that prohibits abortions upon the detection of an embryonic cardiac activity, effectively banning abortion after six weeks. Immediately following the passage of the Act, Planned Parenthood South Atlantic filed suit seeking a temporary injunction, which the federal district court granted.

In their amicus brief, the coalition argues that access to safe and legal abortion is an essential component of women’s health care and restrictive abortion laws, like the South Carolina law, lead to worse health outcomes for women. The coalition also argues that laws banning abortion after the detection of a fetal cardiac activity have harmful spillover effects on miscarriage treatment and other health care needs.

Additionally, AG Ford and his colleagues argue that the restrictions the Act places on women could also threaten residents of neighboring states as well as those states’ health care systems, explaining, “South Carolina’s restrictive abortion laws will cause its citizens to seek abortion care in [neighboring states], potentially straining their health care systems.” The coalition further says, “[g]iven that numerous states across the country have enacted similarly restrictive or more restrictive legislation than South Carolina’s Act…[and] [i]f access to safe and lawful abortions were banned in large geographic portions of the country, it would create vast “abortion deserts” in which access to abortion care may be unobtainable for many people due to the obstacles created by the sheer distance from lawful abortion care.”

In addition to Nevada, other states joining the amicus brief include: California, Colorado, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, and the District of Columbia.

Looks like the fire fighters are going to save Lake Tahoe!!

It’s looking better than earlier in the week…but keep your fingers crossed…

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE – Thousands of people who were chased from their homes at the south end of Lake Tahoe by a big wildfire may soon begin returning to their homes as of 3 p.m. Sunday.  Fire managers say calmer winds and better weather helped them keep the flames under control over the past few days – keeping the fire at 43% contained. The fire is still a few miles out from the California-Nevada border.  Firefighters maintained a “do not pass” fire line which caused visiting the Tahoe Basin mostly impossible.  The Labor Day weekend was a big zero.

Luckily no homes have been lost on the eastern side of the fire nearest the lake.  But as we all know the big blaze burned hundreds of homes on the west slopes of the Sierra.  Only one firefighter lost his life fighting the blaze.  The fire is nearly half-contained.  But the blaze has destroyed nearly 1,300 homes and other buildings in its march to the east.

Weather scientists say fires are getting bigger and more deadly over the past ten years as Climate Change has made the West far warmer and drier over the past third of a century.  And it’s likely to get worse unless the world comes to grips with reality.

There’s been no word on whether residents might be allowed to return home. Fire crews will continue to smother embers and mop up hot spots to make it safe for Tahoe area families to return home around South Lake Tahoe – “in the coming days” they said.

Meanwhile, Douglas County authorities urged residents to stay alert, saying the fire still has the potential to threaten more homes.

Fighting forest fires is becoming the #1 example of Global Warming. We need far more fire fighters and fire preventers…

Becoming a Lake Tahoe conflagration….

South Lake Tahoe – With forest fires caused by lightning strikes and careless campers as we’ve seen in and around Lake Tahoe, it’s getting through to the state and federal governments that they’re going to have to hire a lot more year-round fire fighters if we are to protect our forests, our homes, recreation areas and our fellow citizens.  They’re going to have to take a whole new view of how to better manage and grow more HEALTHY forests as well as to protect them and those who live in and around them. 

Scientists have long said that we say we love our trees and the wildlife among them. But when careless campers and powerful guns and thunder storms rise up it’s obliterating our environment. Something must be done. And many government leaders say it’s time to take care of our forests like they’ve always taken care of us.

Here’s the story: Click here.

Carson City School District Invites Evacuated Fire Families to Enroll Their Families in CC Schools

Carson City School District Invites Evacuated Families in Carson City to Enroll Students  

Carson City, Nev. (Sept. 3, 2021) — The ravaging toll of wildfires have caused thousands of residences and families in Lake Tahoe communities to evacuate their homes and be displaced to shelters throughout northern Nevada. The Carson City School District is inviting all evacuated families in Carson City with school-aged children to enroll their students through the McKinney-Vento Students in Transition program.  

“If there are any families with school-age children who have been evacuated to Carson City, and they are interested in having their students attend school, please reach out,” said Christie Perkins, McKinney-Vento Liaison and special projects coordinator with the Carson City School District. “The program is designed for all those lacking a fixed, regular and adequate nighttime residence.” 

The district is seeking to return a sense of normalcy to the lives of these students and families impacted by the fire, Perkins continued. Students can be enrolled in school immediately, where they can receive free breakfast and lunch, as well as assistance with clothing needs and school supplies. Counselors, peers and other resources are also available to assist.  

So far, more than a dozen families have reached out and have been able to enroll their students and attend schools in Carson City. For more information, please contact Christie Perkins, 775-283-1537, cperkins@carson.k12.nv.us or visit the website.

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